«Performance of language implementations is a function of money, resources, and PhD theses, not language features.» http://programmers.stackexchange.com/a/324317/11732 #programming #link
«Self is much more dynamic than Smalltalk and slightly more dynamic than Python, Ruby, ECMAScript, or Lua, and it had a VM that outperformed all existing Lisp and Smalltalk VMs (in fact, the Self distribution shipped with a small Smalltalk interpreter written in Self, and even that was faster than most existing Smalltalk VMs), and was competitive with, and sometimes even faster than C++ implementations of the time.» #bizarre ‎- 9000
«The Self developers left Sun to start their own company, where they used the technology developed for the Self VM to build one of the fastest Smalltalk VMs ever (the Animorphic VM), and then Sun bought back that company, and a slightly modified version of that #Smalltalk VM is now better known under the name of "HotSpot JVM". Ironically, #Java programmers look down on dynamic languages for being "slow", when in fact, Java was slow until it adopted dynamic language technology.» ‎- 9000
(We must conclude that Ruby community is severely under-financed, or maybe under-PhD-ed.) ‎- 9000
JRuby's doing pretty well by the way ‎- alf
JRuby does this on top of that same Hotspot JVM, as does e.g. Jython. ‎- 9000
There was that Ruby 3x3 initiative (make MRI 3x faster by 3.0 release), however, it seems that most people are fine with the status quo, which is "develop in Ruby until you hit interpreter performance issues, then rewrite hot spots in another language". I don't expect any v8-like revolution in Rubyland any time soon. ‎- mark
OTOH, there's PyPy for Python which is a honest JIT, it gives a huge speed boost. Few people use it because it's not 100% compatible, but rather 99%, so you have to be somehow careful with your libs. Possibly the Ruby community does not want this. JS can afford it because it's used to being incompatible, adding shims, etc. ‎- 9000