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Eivind» posted to Eivind and history
Italian Regency of Carnaro - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_Regency_of_Carnaro
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"The Italian Regency of Carnaro (Italian: Reggenza Italiana del Carnaro) was a self-proclaimed state in the city of Fiume (now Rijeka, Croatia) led by Gabriele d'Annunzio between 1919 and 1920. It is also known by its lyrical name in Italian: Fiume Endeavour (Impresa di Fiume)." ‎· Eivind
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"On September 8, 1920, d'Annunzio proclaimed the city to be under the Italian Regency of Carnaro with a constitution foreshadowing much of the later Italian Fascist system, with himself as dictator, with the title of Duce. [...] The Charter of Carnaro (Carta del Carnaro in Italian) was a constitution that combined anarchist, proto-fascist, and democratic republican ideas. d'Annunzio is often seen as a precursor of the ideals and techniques of Italian fascism. His own explicit political ideals emerged in Fiume when he coauthored with syndicalist Alceste De Ambris. De Ambris provided the legal and political framework, to which d'Annunzio added his skills as a poet. The charter is notorious for designating "music" to be the fundamental principle of the state." ‎· Eivind
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I'm kind of at a loss as to how one can combine anarchist and fascist ideas. Now I gotta read about this in more detail haha ‎· Kickdrum ‎· 1
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@kickdrum: Maybe they were different verses of the fundamental principle of the state? :) ‎· Eivind
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Trees decorated by snow and icy fog
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Eivind» posted to Eivind and history
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"When one thinks of the Nabataeans, the desert comes to mind, with wind-blown sands, the red rock-cut architecture of their capital of Petra, and trade routes carrying incense from Arabia to the Mediterranean. There is, however, another aspect of the Nabataeans, one that is only now coming into focus: Seafaring. The land of the Nabataeans not only included the Jordanian desert but the coast of the Red Sea, reaching southward from Aqaba and down into the northwestern coast of what is now Saudi Arabia. These coasts, mostly barren but containing harbors and access to water, were links to inland trade routes and formed the maritime nexus between Nabataea and the greater world." ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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Eivind» posted to Eivind and history
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"What would these two young feminists have admired in the early Soviet state? At first glance, the intensely bureaucratic and emphatically violent ideology of Bolshevism seems an unlikely fit for the veterans of a movement which regularly exhorted femininity’s pacifying influence. Yet early Bolshevik attempts to reshape the role of women in society had a magnetic draw for many international feminists. For Alexandra Kollontai, a Bolshevik and the first woman to hold a ministerial post, communism heralded the collapse of the traditional family and prophesied that in its place would rise a new gender dynamic built on comradeship. The reforms introduced by Kollontai’s Commissariat for Social Welfare in the early years of the Soviet state included access to birth control and the legalisation of abortion. To enter into international communist networks was to act as a defender of these progressive reforms and to assert your belief that Marxist-Leninist theory provided the only viable route to human emancipation. On a more intrinsic level, as the historian Raphael Samuel has noted, becoming a communist provided a complete social identity. Rose and Nellie, initially attracted by the ideals of the Russian Revolution, became fixtures of a social set based in London’s Hampstead and Moscow’s Tverskaya Boulevard that constituted one of the more unusual friendship networks in modern history." ‎· Eivind
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Went above the timberline today. Absolutely gorgeous. Jenny Badass can be seen in photo 2 and 3 :)

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The cult of Mary Beard "The long read: How a late-blossoming classics don became Britain’s most beloved intellectual" (by Charlotte Higgins) https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/jan/30/mary-beard-the-c...
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“When all this has gone I’ll be in the university library, writing, and I’ll be quite happy. And I’ll think, as I ride home on my bicycle: ‘Didn’t life used to be busy?’” ‎· Eivind ‎· 2
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@eivind: I love her for so many reasons, but I LOVE that she is shown riding her bike in these programs. So many have them driving everywhere and it's nice to highlight that not only are bikes transportation, sometimes they're the *best* transportation by a country mile. ‎· Spidra Webster ‎· 3
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@spidra: I haven't seen any of her TV programs, but I think I should get on that. I also love that she's a bike commuter, but I wasn't aware of the fact until I read this piece. ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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I think it's also related to her neutral humanistic narrative. apart from the political turmoils of the era she focuses on mere human condition. ps.for me it's very relieving to listen her ‎· mach ‎· 2
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@eivind: There are several uploaded to YouTube right now. You totally should. It is so cool to see her walk up to some obscure road marker and translate the Latin for the viewer. ‎· Spidra Webster ‎· 1
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Another long weekend in the mountains :)

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Tea if by sea, cha if by land: Why the world only has two words for tea https://qz.com/1176962/map-how-the-word-tea-spread-over-land-...
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"With a few minor exceptions, there are really only two ways to say “tea” in the world. One is like the English term—té in Spanish and tee in Afrikaans are two examples. The other is some variation of cha, like chay in Hindi. Both versions come from China. How they spread around the world offers a clear picture of how globalization worked before “globalization” was a term anybody used. The words that sound like “cha” spread across land, along the Silk Road. The “tea”-like phrasings spread over water, by Dutch traders bringing the novel leaves back to Europe." ‎· Eivind
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@Halil: It's pretty rare and was, for a time, banned from import. It's possible that ban has been lifted now, I really don't know, but it's still something that is rare to find and when you do it's either in a British foods shop or came over in someone's luggage. Marmite and Vegemite a very slowly gaining some popularity though. You can find both in a chain of stores called Cost Plus World Market which is my experience is the last stop on the "specialty shop" chain for foreign foods before they go mainstream. ‎· Soup ‎· 3
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This is how Norway rolls
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That's Felix, lol ‎· Halil
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It is owned by Purina, and sold in Australia, Russia, the United Kingdom, Belgium, Slovenia, the Republic of Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany and Austria, as well as France, Italy, Greece, Sweden and Denmark (both under the name Pussi), and Finland (under the name Latz). The brand also has milk. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_(pet_food) ‎· Halil
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The Felix brand was acquired from Quaker by Dalgety plc in 1995[2] and then sold to Nestlé in 1997.[3] ‎· Halil
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Nestle again :/ ‎· Halil ‎· 1
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@halil: You should add Norway to the list of countries it's sold in :) ‎· Eivind
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Any comments on the accuracy of this? I don't know much about Germany, but I'm inclined to trust random info-graphics I find on the internet.
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I think the absurd gobbledegook is more Swiss German, but *all* High German looks weird if you've been taught Standard. That said, Low German looks like German with head trauma, so... ‎· Pete Smith ‎· 1
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I have no business making maps, but anyway https://mokum.place/micah/1849177 ‎· Micah ‎· 2
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A syphilis-ridden mummy in Switzerland is a distant ancestor of Boris Johnson "http://nordic.businessinsider.com/syphilis-mummy-in-basel-rel...
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LMAO that photomontage ‎· Eivind ‎· 2
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I'm skipping lunch today. ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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I have smoked salmon in fridge! :( ‎· Halil
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Hmm, might be a good way for me to lose weight though, right, like Victorian ladies used to do? :P ‎· Halil ‎· 2
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@halil: Just make sure you have an empty toilet roll laying around :) ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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Sun came out on Sunday. Look forward to heading back up in a couple of weeks :)
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More winter
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Winter Wonderland
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Oh I miss cross-country skiing ‎· скулптрица ‎· 1
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@elenius: First trip of the winter. Look forward to repeating it tomorrow. So nice to finally have lots of snow again :) ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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Fear, Loathing and Zulm in Iran | History Today http://www.historytoday.com/mehrad-vaezinejad/fear-loathing-a...
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"The protests that broke out across Iran towards the end of 2017 were not triggered by one event. Their cause was mounting unrest at zulm: an all-encompassing term for the injustice, iniquity and oppression that has permeated Iranian society for more than a century. " ‎· Eivind
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"There are consequences to stifling dissent: in a barren political landscape, void of meaningful conversations, imagination rots. Ideas, vital for the progress of any society, die out. And discontent, finding no collective, structured means of expression, turns to primal human instincts." -- Well said. Thanks for sharing the article. ‎· nikka ‎· 1
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Moonrakers is the colloquial name for people from Wiltshire, a county in the West Country of England https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonrakers
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""This name refers to a folk story set in the time when smuggling was a significant industry in rural England, with Wiltshire lying on the smugglers' secret routes between the south coast and customers in the centre of the country. The story goes that some local people had hidden contraband barrels of French brandy from customs officers in a village pond. While trying to retrieve it at night, they were caught by the revenue men, but explained themselves by pointing to the moon's reflection and saying they were trying to rake in a round cheese. The revenue men, thinking they were simple yokels, laughed at them and went on their way. But, as the story goes, it was the moonrakers who had the last laugh. In the words of Wiltshire shepherd William Little who recounted the story to writer John Yonge Akerman: “ Zo the excizeman ’as ax’d ’n the question ’ad his grin at ’n,…but they’d a good laugh at ’ee when ’em got whoame the stuff.”" ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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both very good films! :) ‎· Halil
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Eivind» posted to Eivind and wikituesday
William Foulke (footballer) - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Foulke_(footballer)
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"William Henry "Fatty" Foulke (12 April 1874 – 1 May 1916; sometimes spelled Foulk, Foulkes) was a professional cricketer and football player in England in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Foulke was renowned for his great size (6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)[1] by some estimates) and weight, reaching perhaps 24 stone (152 kg; 336 lb) at the end of his career, although reports on his weight vary." ‎· Eivind
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"According to The Cat's Pyjamas: The Penguin Book of Cliches (ISBN 9780141025162), the "Who ate all the pies?" chant was first sung in 1894 by Sheffield United supporters, and directed at Foulke's 300 lb (about 136 kg)." ‎· Eivind
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"He then moved to Chelsea for a fee of £50 and was made club captain. Foulke by now was remarkably temperamental. If he thought his defenders were not trying hard enough, he would walk off the field. Opposing forwards who incurred his displeasure would be picked up and thrown bodily into his goal. He was, however, a great crowd puller, and Chelsea decided to exploit this. To draw even more attention to his size, they placed two small boys behind his goal in an effort to distract the opposition even more. The boys would sometimes run and return the ball when it went out of play, and quite by accident, ball boys came into being." ‎· Eivind
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Zenith
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8 degrees above the horizon at solar noon, but it's getting better :) ‎· Eivind ‎· 2
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Eivind» posted to Eivind and history
Civilization Caused a Series of Disasters "Why did our prehistoric hunter-gatherer ancestors give up their freedom?" https://newrepublic.com/article/145444/paleo-politics-what-ma...
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"In Against the Grain, Scott argues that we still think of our world as the fruit of a series of undeniable advances: domestication, public order, mass literacy, and prosperity. We chide the ancient Greeks for relying on enslaved labor and the Romans for their imperial wars, but our own story, as we imagine it, still starts with those ancient city-states and their precursors in the Mesopotamian Middle East (basically modern Iraq), when some clever primates first planted rows of seeds, built mud-brick walls, and scratched cuneiform on a crude tablet. In our own minds, we are the descendants of people who couldn’t wait to settle down. The truth, Scott proposes, may be the opposite. What if early civilization was not a boon to humankind but a disaster: for health and safety, for freedom, and for the natural world? What if the first cities were, above all, vast technologies of exploitation by a small and rapacious elite? If that is where we come from, who are we now? What possibilities might we discover by tracing our origins to a different kind of ancestor?" ‎· Eivind
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Eivind» posted to Eivind and great_words
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"(Britain, pejorative) Someone who regularly appears in the media, especially to stir controversy or self-aggrandize." ‎· Eivind
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@eivind: Although "gob" comes from Irish. ‎· Spidra Webster ‎· 2
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@spidra: A google search indicates gob as "mouth" perhaps comes from the Celtic/Gaelic word for "muzzle/beak/snout," yes :) ‎· Eivind
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Happy Perihelion, Mokum!
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We're only about 147.1 million kilometers (91.4 million miles) away from the sun today. That's as close as it gets :) ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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(The illustration is very exaggerated. The sun is only about 5 million clicks further away at Aphelion.) ‎· Eivind ‎· 1
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Happy New Year from Norway :)
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Br'er Eivind! JENNY BADASS! ‎· MoTO Babycakes ‎· 2
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Jenny's been told :) ‎· Eivind
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Yacob and Amo: Africa’s precursors to Locke, Hume and Kant – Dag Herbjørnsrud https://aeon.co/amp/essays/yacob-and-amo-africas-precursors-t...
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There are still some good things in this world. Like BBQ buoys with outboard motors.
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I believe you like goats in trees, right? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yule_Goat ‎· Halil
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@halil: We always decorated with those, both the tree and aroind the house. My grandma giving me one as a gift for my 12th birthday is part of family lore. (I had a really hard time pretending I was pleased with the gift.) ‎· Eivind ‎· 3

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