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Did the First Americans Arrive Via A Kelp Highway? http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/deadthings/2017/11/02/first-americans-kelp-highway/#.WfxOA1tSyM8

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"Thanks to a growing body of archaeological and genetic evidence, researchers publishing today in Science say it’s increasingly likely that the first humans to arrive in the Americas followed a coastal route, making the most of marine resources on a “kelp highway” that spanned the edge of the north Pacific from Asia to North America. And they made this journey well before glaciers retreated to open the traditional Beringia overland route."

 ‎· Eivind
Comment

"To be clear, the kelp highway hypothesis is not new. It’s a 21st century tweak of a coastal migration theory that was around — and discounted — for much of the preceding century, when many in the field were all in on the Beringia overland idea. In 2007, archaeologist Jon Erlandson and colleagues, including marine ecologists, fleshed out the earlier idea of coastal migration by reconstructing the environment these early travelers would have encountered. About 16,000 years ago, someone traveling along the northern Pacific Ocean coastline eastward from Siberia would have encountered an essentially unobstructed route at sea level, with plenty of fish, shellfish, kelp, seabirds and other resources — and no dangerous open ocean. The specificity of the hypothesis, together with subsequent archaeological discoveries that defy the Beringia timeline, led more and more researchers to rethink whether they wanted to stay in the overland migration camp. What’s new about the kelp highway hypothesis, according to authors of today’s commentary, is that we’ve passed a tipping point, and that most of the field now believes the First Americans followed this Pacific Rim buffet all the way from Siberia to the North American coastline and beyond. As these earliest of Americans moved south into Central America, the marine ecosystem would have changed — no more kelp forests, but mangrove habitats instead, which offered different sustaining fare that the adaptable humans made use of."

 ‎· Eivind

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