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Shakespeare’s ‘Twelfth Night’ Taught Me About Being a Twin | Lindsey Trout Hughes https://catapult.co/stories/lindsey-trout-hughes-shakespeare-twelfth-night-twins-family-cancer

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"When we were little, before the infection in my sister’s left cornea was diagnosed, I had dreams for weeks that I couldn’t open my right eye. When my sister injured her left knee, I fell to the ground on a soccer field fifty miles away; for no reason anyone could discern, my right kneecap felt shattered. On prom night, I felt so raw I couldn’t bear to be touched, but my sister was the one nursing a third-degree sunburn, blisters in the outline of a soccer jersey above her terrific neon dress. When my twin experienced pain, my body seemed to know."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Then when we were twenty-four, my sister got cancer, and I felt nothing in my body."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"I thought of the raucous physical humor in The Comedy of Errors. Both plays feature parted twins. Both plays are categorized as comedies. Twelfth Night is a story of mistaken identities, trickery, and music, with plenty of gender fun. Why, then, did Twelfth Night feel so much sadder than Shakespeare’s other twin play? After a quick internet search, I learned what caused the shift in tone: Shakespeare was the father of a set of fraternal twins born in 1585, Hamnet and Judith."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"He wrote The Comedy of Errors in 1593, when the twins were eight years old. Some scholars speculate that the play’s farcical nature was meant to alleviate the stigma twins faced in early modern England, a time when twins were often associated with tragedies. Then, in 1596, Shakespeare’s son Hamnet died when he was eleven years old, leaving his twin sister Judith behind. Five years later, in 1601, Shakespeare wrote Twelfth Night. In it, he gives us the scene of a girl emerging from a tempest-tossed sea, grieving the loss of her twin."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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'Waiting for my name to be called, I closed my eyes and tried to reach out for my sister in the secret space I once believed twins to inhabit. But I could not find her. I had no sense of her at all, and I understood all at once that our separation was not a product of physical distance. It had begun as soon as I started relying on a cosmic closeness, some mysterious twin connection, to replace the work of sisterhood—the accompanying and comforting and discovering that real relationships require. The circumstances of our birth did not afford me any special knowledge of her. My understanding of her was not accurate, nor was it earned. Performing twinhood—dressing alike as children and posing together for photographs on our shared birthday—was not enough to stand in for a meaningful relationship. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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LOL. Google "dragon boat festival". ;-)

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(The first time: Hey nothing happened. Oh wait, I’m on Duck Duck Go. Oops)

 ‎· bentley 4
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This made me curious what was happening locally, and...

 ‎·  d.png ‎· Micah 2
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Friday smiles!

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#bestOfDay

 ‎· Julian 2
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A Nutcracker in June https://dancebusinessweekly.com/nutcracker-june-ballet-academy-pittsburgh/

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"A growing Christmas tree. Angels and mice. Flowers and a sugarplum. Snow. Last week, the curtain rose on a festive performance of The Nutcracker…in June? The pandemic has brought all sorts of odd workarounds for dance studios, from virtual classes to outdoor performances. But when COVID-19 threatened Ballet Academy of Pittsburgh’s annual Nutcracker, the school decided to make an especially bold pivot: to hold it in early June, when most schools are doing their end-of-year summer recitals."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"Back in October, when preparations would have had to have begun for a traditional Nutcracker, COVID-19 cases were starting to rise, and it was clear that staging The Nutcracker at the usual time would be devoid of the holiday cheer that makes it special. Plus, no one was vaccinated, so chances of the show being derailed by COVID-19 were high, and there would be no live audience. “We knew some schools livestreamed or staged it later in the winter,” says Lindsay Piper, who founded the school in 2006 with her husband, Steven Piper. “We had faith that the vaccines would make a big difference by June and that we’d be able to stage it close to normal.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Piper says it felt remarkably typical to be working on The Nutcracker once they got going—and got past the lack of snow dotting the outside of the studio. As counterintuitive as it may seem, doing The Nutcracker in June has given students a sense of much-needed normalcy and continuity. “One of my Sugar Plums, she’s been with me since she was 4 years old,” says Piper. “This was her year to be Sugar Plum and we wanted her to have that moment, and for her family to be able to be there to see it.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"The June date hasn’t kept Piper from leaning in to some holiday joy. She still decorated the lobby with a Christmas tree, a large Nutcracker and other holiday ornamentation. “Why not embrace it?,” she asks. But perhaps the biggest perk of waiting until June has been the reduction of COVID-19 cases, and the peace of mind that comes with it. “People just aren’t as afraid now. We can enjoy the experience so much more than if we had tried to do something in December,” says Piper."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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» posted to JustDuckie, history, and eccentric-strange-news

A 6-Year-Old Requested A Birthday Cake Showing The Beheading Of Anne Boleyn And That’s Exactly What She Got https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/adeonibada/six-year-old-birthday-cake-anne-boleyn-beheaded

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"When Edmund Kingsley and his wife, Anna Morrissey, asked their 5-year-old daughter for suggestions on what her birthday cake should look like, her unique response didn’t entirely surprise them. “She said, ‘Well, my friend is getting unicorns, but I think what I'd really like is Henry VIII executing Anne Boleyn with Elizabeth I watching,” Kingsley told BuzzFeed News. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 3
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Hahaha I want to adopt this child! <3

 ‎· grizabella 4
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The only way this could be improved is if Catherine of Aragon was also looking on, with a "told you so" expression on her face.

 ‎· LibSkrat 9
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That's a lot of bubbly.

 ‎· Kendra K 3
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Pictured (R): Anne, the patron saint of bitcoin.

 ‎· Micah 4
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» posted to JustDuckie, nature, and eccentric-strange-news

Gender reveal party goes wrong when two raccoons fall from the sky https://www.newsweek.com/gender-reveal-party-two-raccoons-fall-sky-1593753

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"However, when the combine harvester is turned on two raccoons fall from the header, one after the other, splatting onto the gravel below. The two animals, clearly as stunned as the partygoers, scurry to get to their feet and one scuttles away, traveling straight through the legs of one of the guests."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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I feel like now every single gender reveal party is just trying to one-up and get the last gender reveal party to hold their beer.

 ‎· Galadriel 4
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Simone Biles Dials Up the Difficulty, ‘Because I Can’ https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/24/sports/olympics/simone-biles-yurchenko-double-pike.html

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"The Yurchenko double pike is considered so perilous and challenging that no other woman has attempted it in competition, and it is unlikely that any woman in the world is even training to give it a try. To execute it, a gymnast first must launch herself into a roundoff back handspring onto the vaulting table, and then propel herself high enough to give herself time to flip twice in a pike position (body folded, legs straight) before landing on her feet."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"It’s the kind of maneuver done much more easily by a platform diver who has the help of gravity and the safety of a soft landing. Biles, though, executes it by producing enough speed and strength to power herself high in the air and then flip so quickly on the way down that gravity seems to have been taken by surprise. Others were too."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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The video is just.... :O https://twitter.com/NBCOlympics/status/1396458393645187078

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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She's just so dang amazing.

 ‎· Kirsten 2
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‘This Day Was Bound to Come’: Taiwan Confronts a Covid Flare-Up https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/20/world/asia/taiwan-covid-outbreak.html

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"By shutting its borders early and requiring two-week quarantines of nearly everyone who arrives from overseas, Taiwan had been managing to keep life on the island mostly unfettered. But all that changed after enough infections slipped past those high walls to cause community outbreaks. For most of the past week, the government has ordered residents to stay home whenever possible and to wear masks outdoors, though it has not declared a total lockdown. Local authorities are ramping up rapid testing, though some health experts worry that too few tests are being done to stay ahead of the virus’s spread. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Taiwan’s latest numbers — between 200 and 350 new infections a day for the past several days, and a few deaths — are still low by the standards of the hardest-hit countries. On Thursday, it reported 286 new local infections. But the uptick has jolted a population that, until last Saturday, had recorded only 1,290 Covid-19 cases and 12 deaths during the entire pandemic. Adding to the concern: Only around 1 percent of the island’s 23.5 million residents have been vaccinated against the virus so far. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"On April 14, the government began allowing crew members for Taiwanese airlines to quarantine at home for just three days after arriving on long-haul flights, down from the previous requirement of five days. A week later, China Airlines, Taiwan’s flag carrier, told the government that one of its pilots had tested positive in Australia. Health officials began expanding testing for airline workers. Soon, more pilots and their family members were testing positive, as were employees at a quarantine hotel. On May 10, a pilot who had been in the United States tested positive after completing his three-day quarantine, but not before he had visited a pub and a restaurant in Taipei."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Nutmeg Ballet Conservatory strips dance of name after Hindu activist calls it ‘patronizing’ and ‘caricaturing’ https://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-news-nutmeg-ballet-torrington-la-bayadere-hindu-20210517-p6j6ste7cjhq7nanrybzlzjqga-story.html

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"A Torrington ballet company is striking the name of a classic ballet from its graduation performances this week after a Hindu activist called out the dance troupe online, saying “La Bayadère” “seriously trivializes Eastern religious and other traditions.” The Nutmeg Ballet Conservatory will perform the “Kingdom of the Shades” segment from “La Bayadère,” the 1877 ballet by Marius Petipa, from May 18 to 21 at Warner Theatre in Torrington. The ballet company will bill the segment not as “La Bayadère” but as “Petipa highlights.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"“La Bayadère,” whose title translates to “The Temple Dancer,” tells the story of an Indian dancer who is loved by two men. “The Kingdom of the Shades,” from Act II of the opera, depicts an opium-fueled dream of the reunited lovers. Artistic director Victoria Mazzarelli told The Courant that the “Kingdom of the Shades” segment was chosen as an educational exercise for students of the dance school and was originally planned to be performed with no reference to the ballet’s plot."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Director of Operations Holly Hawk released a statement: “The students perform with no scenery and minimal costumes. As such, the excerpts are devoid of context and convey no story to the audience. Our performance, while using the music and classical choreography of the original, includes nothing that could be construed as stereotyping or orientalist depiction. As such, and with full sensitivity to the problem of insensitive depiction of other cultures, we are comfortable with our decision to present them.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Māori leader removed from New Zealand parliament after performing haka https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/12/asia/rawiri-waititi-maori-haka-parliament-scli-intl/index.html

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"Rawiri Waititi interjected while Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was taking questions from lawmakers on Wednesday, accusing the country's opposition party of "racist propaganda and rhetoric." After a tense exchange with the Speaker, which resulted in his microphone being turned off, Waititi began the traditional Māori haka and was asked to leave. The haka, a ceremonial war dance performed before events including New Zealand rugby matches, is intended as a challenge to opponents and a rallying cry before heading into battle. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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Worth mentioning that this form of self expression (haka) before the battle possibly had some impact on those battles (arrguably) as there were far less violence than many would assume and most times those battles didn't leave any people dead, only wounded and beaten up with wooden clubs. By European standards imagining a serious "full on" conflict where the best fight the best and as a result no one dies - well.. it's way towards Olympic games than any actual serious war, however deep in our history you go we had blood baths normalised far and wide. They could know how to conduct a conflict better, with less harm.. maybe if our politicians had to do a dance showing their scariest faces to each other before their meetings things would be going easier for us too.

 ‎· почему шуршит 2
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^ Our politicians have other customs for performative aggression, and I don't think it makes much of a difference.

 ‎· Anna C. 2
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Water dance: a drone’s eye view of synchronised swimming https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2021/may/13/water-dance-a-drones-eye-view-of-synchronised-swimming

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» posted to JustDuckie and nature

Wild Medicine by Rachel Bunting https://www.hippocampusmagazine.com/2021/05/wild-medicine-by-rachel-bunting/

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"This hawk is the first really wild thing I have touched. Up close, he is much larger than I expected, nearly 24 inches tall with a wingspan of more than three feet. He has wing damage and a cut on his left side from being tangled in construction netting. He is scared and hostile: anyone who opens the kennel door will find him focused intensely, ready to lash out and snap at an arm or hand coming too close. This is the moment I’ve been fearing; surely, it’s too soon for me to be handling a hawk, I haven’t learned the protocol yet. But I have learned already that this is the way it works at the wildlife hospital: you learn to handle the hawk by handling the hawk."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in January 2015. For a while, things were largely unchanged — many of the initial symptoms that led to my diagnosis abated once I began treatment, and the one symptom that remained (a constant pins-and-needles feeling in all of my fingers) didn’t interfere with my life in a significant way. I continued working, writing, taking karate classes, hiking in the Pine Barrens. I considered myself lucky; after all, I had such a mild case. By the middle of 2018, I started to have difficulty walking distances of more than a mile. After only a few months, I realized that my right leg was no longer going to follow the signals from my brain. Instead of the effortless coordination of hip, knee, and ankle, my right foot began dropping repeatedly once I reached the one-mile mark, like I had suddenly acquired a ten-pound weight."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"This is what I have come to love over many years: dawn hikes in midsummer led me, accompanied by woodpeckers and warblers, to gatherings of pink lady slippers and Indian pipes beneath pitch pines stretching toward the rising sun. Sometimes, hiking into late morning, I’d find a fawn napping trailside or a raccoon fishing lazily in a shallow creek. Once, I caught a glimpse of an orange tail disappearing into a thick cluster of mountain laurel — a red fox, skittish and shy. Here, miles from a paved road, there is a feeling of being untouched and unbroken. And this, I understand, is what MS demands I give up."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Sick still seems like a temporary state of being — you get sick when you have a cold, when you eat two-day-old shrimp scampi. It passes. But what I feel is not temporary, this spiderweb of doctors’ appointments and infusions, of lab tests and mercurial black-and-white images of my brain, of good days with long walks at the local park and bad days when an electric shock runs from my head to my toes each time I look down. But if this is immutable, this idea that my body is no longer what it was, then so is my determination to keep hold of what I can. If I am required to recognize new losses as this disease progresses, then I will continue to look for ways to hold on to the things I can, to keep loving the things I have always loved. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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The Lure of H Mart, Where the Shelves Can Seem as Wide as Asia https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/11/dining/h-mart.html

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"The theme is abundance — chiles from fat little thumbs to witchy fingers, bulk bins of fish balls, live lobsters brooding in blue tanks, a library of tofu. Cuckoo rice cookers gleam from the shelves like a showroom of Aston Martins. Customers fill baskets with wands of lemongrass, dried silvery anchovies, shrimp chips and Wagyu beef sliced into delicate petals. For decades in America, this kind of shopping was a pilgrimage. Asian-Americans couldn’t just pop into the local Kroger or Piggly Wiggly for a bottle of fish sauce. To make the foods of their heritage, they often had to seek out the lone Asian grocery in town, which was salvation — even if cramped and dingy, with scuffed linoleum underfoot and bags of rice slumped in a corner."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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@bentleywg Yeah Koreans are big on banana-flavored items for some reason. Like banana milk is hugely popular but neither myself nor my kids really like them.

 ‎· ronin 1
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A Man Suspected Of Murder Was On The Run With A Bengal Tiger, Police Said https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/salvadorhernandez/houston-tiger-police-murder

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"As police began to arrive on the scene, the tiger's owner then fled the neighborhood with the animal inside his SUV, authorities said. Houston police later identified the man as Victor Hugo Cuevas, a 26-year-old who was out on bond. Cuevas, Borza said, is currently facing an unrelated murder charge in Fort Bend County. The case was filed in November, but authorities did not release further details in that case."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Fleeing from the police and being in possession of the tiger could violate his bond terms, police said."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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You don't say!

 ‎· Meg Vmeg 6
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Looks like they found the guy but not the tiger :( https://www.cnn.com/2021/05/10/us/houston-tiger-murder-suspect-trnd/index.html

 ‎· Meg Vmeg 3
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@megvmeg: oops

 ‎· bentley
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‘Dracula’s castle’ offers tourists Covid shots https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/may/10/dracula-castle-offers-tourists-covid-shots

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"Visitors to Romania’s forbidding Bran Castle, which styles itself as the inspiration for Dracula’s lair, are being jabbed with needles rather than vampire fangs in a coronavirus vaccination drive. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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» posted to JustDuckie, nature, and eccentric-strange-news

Oh cool, now we have tigers roaming around Houston https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/houston-tiger-seen-roaming-neighborhood-16164918.php

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"One neighborhood man took it upon himself to approach the tiger, arming himself with a gun and yelling at the tiger's apparent caretaker, "Get the f--k back inside. F--k you and your f--king tiger." "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"As an owner of cats, some of them ferrel in the past, the solution here is laser pointer and treats." - https://mobile.twitter.com/javierjones/status/1391739117206183941

 ‎· лопата учёных из Омска 3
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The Best Way to Find Water? Magic. https://www.outsideonline.com/2422818/dowsing-water-magic-mystery

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"Dowsing is the old-world way of finding things. It is not, definitively, a science; it is pre-science—a method born before the Enlightenment to find, among other things, water, minerals, oil, gemstones, buried treasure, energies emanating from the earth, fugitives, missing kids, missing dogs, missing cats, and, according to some fervent practitioners, the pears that are ripest in the produce aisle. Its names are as numerous as its aims: divining, doodlebugging, water witching, water smelling, peach-twig toting, well prophesying, rhabdomancy, and, from the lips of the most pragmatic among them, finding water with a stick."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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I've done it (for water) a couple of times. I think my most impressive result was when we wanted to run electricity from our house to the detached garage. Mr. B had rented a Ditch Witch trencher but needed to avoid a water pipe. He spent the morning digging holes with a shovel trying to find the pipe, but to no avail. I had him cut and bend a couple of pieces of wire for me, and I instantly found the pipe. The look on his face was great!

 ‎· LB. Just LB. 2
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Gymnastics Is a Brutal Sport. Does It Have to Be? https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/04/magazine/gymnastics-abuse.html

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"Memmel is the seventh-most-decorated female gymnast in U.S. history, tied with the 2008 Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson. But she had not done elite gymnastics in seven years, and at 31, she was nearly twice the ideal age for an Olympic gymnast — often posited to be 16, the youngest age permitted at the Games. Memmel braced every muscle in her body, wiped her mind clear and threw the layout. (“Throw,” the gymnastics word for “do,” is one of the few verbs commonly used in the sport that come anywhere close to capturing gymnasts’ sheer physical force. The Olympic medalist Aly Raisman has said that her coaches have told her to throw skills on the balance beam as if she were trying to break it.) To her surprise, Memmel finished cleanly. She threw one more skill, then another. Eventually, her father, Andy Memmel, who coached her from when she was 16 until she retired at 24 — the age Simone Biles is now — started giving notes."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Four months after Memmel’s first casual flipping, she announced an official comeback on her YouTube channel. She had just successfully thrown an Amanar, one of the most difficult vaults for women and one she had never tried before, even during the years that she considered her peak. Memmel typically speaks with a combination of succinctness and humility that flows easily into ringside articulations of patriotic duty, but when we spoke for the first time last summer, she seemed unable to suppress excitement at her spectacular, unplanned return. “I am just hitting every little thing I am trying,” she told me."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Memmel remains a long shot to make the Olympic team: She has yet to complete a full routine in public this season (although, to be fair, neither has Biles), and Olympic trials are less than two months away. But by merely training at the elite level, Memmel has flouted what is perhaps the most foundational notion in gymnastics training: that the world’s most talented gymnasts, after peaking in their teens, inevitably burn out before mature adulthood."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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One of the reasons I like ice dance (and even pairs) is that skaters can stay at an elite level for quite a long time. Solo skating is this kind of brutal for too many young athletes.

 ‎· LibSkrat 1
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Digital Horses Are the Talk of the Crypto World https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/01/style/zed-run-horse-racing.html

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"On Zed Run, a digital horse racing platform, several such events take place every hour, seven days a week. Owners pay modest entry fees — usually between $2 and $15 — to run their steeds against others for prize money. The horses in these online races are NFTs, or “nonfungible tokens,” meaning they exist only as digital assets. You can’t pet them or feed them carrots by hand. You can’t sit in the stands sipping mint juleps while they sprint by. But, unlike the vast majority of NFTs — which correspond to GIFs, images and videos that can be kept as collectibles or sold for profit — each digital horse constitutes what Zed Run’s creators call a “breathing NFT.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"“A breathing NFT is one that has its own unique DNA,” said Roman Tirone, the head of partnerships at Virtually Human, the Australian studio that created Zed Run. “It can breed, has a bloodline, has a life of its own. It races, it has genes it passes on, and it lives on an algorithm so no two horses are the same.” (Yes, owners can breed their NFT horses in Zed Run’s “stud farm.”) "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Alex Taub, a tech start-up founder in Miami, has purchased 48 of them. “Most NFTs, you buy them and sell them, and that’s how you make money,” Mr. Taub, 33, said. “With Zed, you can earn money on your NFT by racing or breeding.” His stable is still growing. He recently bred a digital horse for his 5-year-old daughter. “She comes home from school and wants to race it,” he said. “She named her horse Gemstone, and Gemstone had two babies named Rainbows and Sparkles.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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» posted to JustDuckie and nature

Report Finds 100 Wolf Packs May Lose Pups From February Hunt That Did Little To Resolve Conflicts https://www.wpr.org/report-finds-100-wolf-packs-may-lose-pups-february-hunt-did-little-resolve-conflicts

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"The report released by Wisconsin’s Green Fire called the February wolf hunt, during which hunters blew past their quota and killed 218 wolves in less than 72 hours, a "prime example of what happens when wolf management is driven by politics instead of science.""

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Wydeven said the hunt did little to resolve those conflicts, adding that DNR data indicates wolf depredations of livestock are edging upward." --> Somewhere I know I've seen a biology paper that supports this. Random harvesting of wolves means you're often eliminating the breeding pair or those pack members that are more skilled hunters. Which means the remaining wolves, less skilled at hunting, are going to be attacking livestock.

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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A Poor Puerto Rican Girl’s Bread - The Nasiona https://www.thenasiona.com/2021/04/25/a-poor-puerto-rican-girls-bread/

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"Bread was important. We never made bread, we bought it or worked for it. Bread came long, warm, and folded from the Italians up the street and down the block or the panaderia. Bread was something you ate con café con leche. Big yellow or white cuts of cubed cheese stuffed in between panaderia bread dipped in café or chocolate made our tiny mouths water. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"We never made bread, we bought or worked for it. Mami made other things. She made alcapurrias, pasteles, sorullitos de queso, bacalaitos, mofongo, and tostones. Our bread we bought. Mami’s little worn hands were soldiers in a war. They saluted only to adobo, recao, sofrito, and sazon. Café con leche was her muse and arroz con gandules her trophy. Flan made everything and everyone in the house still. Mami’s hands’ magic powers would leave us chewing in silence. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Bread was important. We never had yeast; single-cell organism that converts food through fermentation into carbon dioxide, giving way to rising. We never rose. With section 8 housing mobile vouchers we moved from one home to another, chasing bread and dreams. The caseworkers would often lose our recertification papers and mami with her head down and using me as her voice, would apologize to them. Caseworkers stuck in their own systems of being over caseload and deep-set dark under eyes always looked somberly at me while I listened patiently to translate. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Bread was important, we still never made it, we bought it or worked for it. At 18 years old I got pregnant. I worked for my bread 6 days a week down the street from mami’s house. I didn’t have a license, but I was able to walk to work. Bread was flowing in and flowing out. High school didn’t teach financial education. I don’t remember how I spent my bread those days. I gave mami bread. I’d stuff it in between her tiny worn hands while she tried to push it away. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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" I didn’t want to be stuck in a system where bread hinges on my worth and my income. A system that helps and hurts. A couple of years after that I tripled what I made my first year out of college. I bought a home, a car, set down roots and did taxes every year on my own. Mami full of pride still feeds me bread that she buys with her plastic card. I sit and eat it with her because we still don’t make bread in our homes. We buy it or we work for it. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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The Ghost That Sits on Your Chest | Kathy McLeod https://catapult.co/stories/kathy-macleod-comic-thailand-ghosts-superstitions-grief

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Friend of mine is obsessed with this kind of sleep paralysis (woman on chest) because a roommate of his in college had this happen to him and overnight converted to being a super conservative evangelical, convinced (to this day) that an actual demon tried to kill him. (I have blocked said roommate on FB, because he is awful.) I love this comic though, especially the end.

 ‎· Jennifer D. 1
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What My Sled Dogs Taught Me About Planning for the Unknown https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/23/sports/sled-dogs-mushing-unknowns-planning.html

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"As a musher — the human driver of a dog sled team — this is one of my main challenges. There are many ways in which my dogs know more than me. They know if a storm is coming, or if a moose crossed the trail days before. They know how ice shifts under their paws. They know if we’re being followed and by what kind of animal. They know their own power — that they’re stronger than me, much stronger, and if they turn or stop when I ask them to, it’s because they’re choosing to listen and trust me. Running together is a gift they give me every day. But each time my dogs hit the trail, they run hard — they give it everything they’ve got. That’s fine if we’re going 10 miles, or 30, distances they can cover easily in a few hours. We can leave after dinner and be home by midnight, silver snow on a full-moon night. But what if we’re going a hundred miles, or a thousand? Asking sled dogs to pace themselves, to slow it down, is like asking a retriever to only fetch one ball out of three: It goes against their every instinct."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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I've been thinking about this article a lot lately. It was written three months before vaccines became available, so the general outlook is considerably brighter now. But we still don't know how far we have to go before it's over.

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Thunderbird Dancer Michael Taylor on What Dance Teachers Can Learn From Native American Culture https://dance-teacher.com/thunderbird-dancer-michael-taylor-native-american/

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"Having studied in multiple dance genres, Taylor says Native American dance training is completely different from any other. “It’s not formal classes where you learn steps that you do over and over again,” he says. “It’s a lot of watching others at powwows [ceremonies involving feasting, singing and dancing—some of which have evolved into competitions], and trying. If you really want it, you show up, get out there and dance. Even if you don’t think you’re ready, if you have the courage to just do it, people will come help you learn more."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"Taylor emphasizes that there are many tribes and nations with their own unique customs and dances, but that for most all of them, if you show a desire and commitment to learn, they will show you how to dance."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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What Moving During a Pandemic Taught Me About the Meaning of Home | Dorothy Bendel https://catapult.co/stories/dorothy-bendel-moving-during-pandemic-luck-superstition-meaning-of-home

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"When you first move into a new home, you should enter through the front door and exit through the same, or you will never fully settle in. Lighting a candle or starting a fire in a fireplace welcomes light and expels darkness. Ringing a bell in your new home brings good luck. Heating up milk with rice on a stove and allowing it to boil over the sides brings abundance and wealth. Salt can be sprinkled around doorways to repel evil spirits. Fennel stuffed into keyholes prevents witches from entering. Old brooms carry old “dirt” and bad luck; they should not be brought into a new home."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Maybe there are so many superstitions tied to moving house because change is deeply disruptive. Moving means reconfiguring your life. A new home informs where you will spend your time and your money. It swaps out the neighbor you chatted with by a row of mailboxes for a new neighbor who chats with you on your front stoop; it brings new creaking noises that wake you in the middle of the night, until those sounds become familiar. It changes how the morning light enters your bedroom window."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Some folk traditions maintain that each home is guarded by spirits. This belief is sometimes connected to the idea that opening an umbrella indoors is bad luck. Since an umbrella protects from the rain, to open one in a house is an insult, suggesting that the home’s spirits are incapable of providing the same protection. I wonder if, for some, believing in house spirits is a way to find some relief, to feel as though someone is looking out for you, even when you don’t feel safe."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1

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