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it feels impossible to be a working mom with little kids https://www.askamanager.org/2022/01/it-feels-impossible-to-be-a-working-mom-with-little-kids.html

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"My question is rooted in an issue I think a lot of working moms with kids under five must be facing right now. I have two small children, one who is just barely two and a four-year-old. Since Covid started when I was on a leave of absence with my youngest, born January 2020, I’ve just never felt settled or on top of my job. I’m consistently two months behind on my work and my daycare keeps closing for either positive cases or exposures. Every time this happens I’m left to work from home or take unpaid leave. I’m out of PTO, which I get a generous amount of but it’s all been used on staying home with my children while daycare closes. My husband is now recently out of PTO as well and since he earns the higher wage, it just makes sense for me to be the one watching the kids while he works. Also, there’s no more Covid pay or family tax credit to ease these breaks where I no longer get paid, so I truly have to work from home. My work expects me to work in person because I’m vaccinated, but my kids keep getting sent home. It feels impossible."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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"Working from home is pure hell. I have to wake up at 4 am and work until my kids are up, work while they nap and then work once they go to sleep. I will still get urgent calls during the day and while I have an assistant she just isn’t equipped to handle most of these tasks. So this means I’m usually busy with work or children from 4 am to 11 or 12 at night. I have no time for myself. I barely recognize myself. My husband is a fantastic helper but since his shifts are typically 12 hours, a lot of this responsibility lands on me. There is no one to help with the kids when school is closed and I feel like it would be irresponsible for me to expose anyone to them during this time anyway. They are too young to be vaccinated and only the four-year-old wears a mask. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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"I guess my question is how are other moms doing this? I’m doing a bad job at work, I hate the feeling of being behind, I hate being so busy all day everyday and then on top of it my work is so broken up I’m not able to put in a 40-hour week or get a full paycheck … ever. I’m working harder than ever and getting nothing out of it. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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@hedgielib - for your bibliography

 ‎· Galadriel 3
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my coworker tried to film her pregnancy announcement and now there is chaos https://www.askamanager.org/2022/01/my-coworker-tried-to-film-her-pregnancy-announcement-and-now-there-is-chaos.html

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What the actual fuck???

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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Perfect example of how useless HR is when situations like this come up. HR should stand for Horrible Ridiculousness.

 ‎· The Common Masked Jill 5
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» posted to JustDuckie and eccentric-strange-news

In battle of Dallas vs. Houston, Rockets win with weird Froot Loops hot dog https://www.dallasnews.com/food/2022/01/12/in-battle-of-dallas-vs-houston-rockets-win-with-weird-fruit-loop-covered-hot-dog/

Comment

"During the Mavericks vs. Rockets game in Houston last weekend, the Toyota Center sold a $12.50 hot dog smothered in mac and cheese, bacon and Froot Loops. That’s such a bizarre combination of ingredients that it might’ve taken the focus off the main event, the Rockets’ loss to the Mavs, 106 to 130."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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*vomits in Texan*

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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“win”

 ‎· bentley 2
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Opinion | I See Signs of Despair From Parents of Kids Under 5 https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/12/opinion/parents-school-omicron.html

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"Most American children 5 and older are going to class in person, and Covid vaccines are available to them. The vaccine remains unavailable to kids under 5, and it’s still unclear when it will be approved for them. To perhaps point out the obvious, if they’re quarantining, many children under 5 can’t just hang out independently or remain quietly occupied for any useful length of time by TV or sustained silent reading. Which means remote learning for preschoolers winds up either as sort of a joke or requires intense parental involvement."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"At the same time, more workplaces are open now than in earlier Covid waves. Most Americans aren’t working remotely, and even for the parents who are, being at home all day, trying to keep a toddler alive, fed and entertained makes it just about impossible to get anything else done."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"“This is the scariest time of the pandemic for sending my kids to day care,” said Margot Zarin-Pass, a pediatrician and internist in Minneapolis. Her two children are 3½ years old and 10 months old. She’s seen the rise in pediatric hospitalizations during the Omicron wave. Because she lives in freezing-cold Minnesota, spending a ton of time outside right now isn’t really feasible; she also doesn’t feel that it’s safe to bring her kids to libraries or children’s museums because of how easily Omicron spreads, so they’re frequently stuck inside for days at a time. “It feels like we’re more alone and abandoned than we previously have been, because our kids haven’t had a chance to get vaccinated,” she said, even though a lot of the rest of society seems to be trying to move on from Covid to live more normal lives."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"I’ve heard from many parents that their children who go to day care frequently have had to quarantine for stretches of 10 to 14 days as a result of Covid exposures. For hourly workers and single parents especially, this is untenable, and can even lead to financial catastrophe — you still have to pay for day care, even if your kid isn’t attending, and you won’t get paid if you can’t work. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"We’re beyond calming platitudes, admonitions to do yoga and promises from politicians that there will be a reasonable fix during the Covid surges that are now predictable parts of our lives. “I think there was all of this fire and anger that the parents are blah blah blah and all this talk, and I think early on made us feel something might change,” said Ellie Erickson, a pediatrician and mom of two children under 4 in North Carolina. “And now it’s pretty clear that it absolutely isn’t.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Fort Worth arts coalition buys Panther Island’s KKK building https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/fort-worth/article257216537.html

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"A coalition of arts nonprofits announced Tuesday it is purchasing the building at 1012 N. Main St., once the site of a Ku Klux Klan meeting hall."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Transform 1012 N. Main Street plans to open the Fred Rouse Center for the Arts and Community Healing, named in honor of the Black Stockyards worker and Fort Worth resident lynched 100 years ago by a white mob. The Ku Klux Klan meeting hall was built three years later."

 ‎· JustDuckie 4
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After Childbirth and Prolapse, I Turned to Weight Lifting | Sarah Stoller https://catapult.co/stories/sarah-stoller-after-childbirth-and-prolapse-i-turned-to-weight-lifting-parental-leave-pregnancy

Comment

"When it comes to treating prolapse, there is no universal consensus among providers, and a widespread lack of evidence-based care borne of inadequate research. I experienced this myself: In my first year postpartum I saw four physical therapists—two paid for by my health insurance, and two out of pocket—none of whom agreed with one another. One told me I didn’t have a prolapse at all, another that I shouldn’t lift anything heavier than ten pounds (say, my baby), and another that I shouldn’t sit cross-legged (utter nonsense). I wove a frustrating, circuitous, and costly path before I found my way to the support that did help me. I found it not, as one would hope, through doctors who were concerned about my ongoing discomfort and distress but, as is the way with much of women’s healthcare, via very well-read, very angry women on the internet."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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"Since the rise of Crossfit in the early 2000s, women have increasingly participated in strength training. But it has remained a highly gendered physical pursuit. This is unfortunate, because strength is especially important for the day-to-day labor of care—feminized work, but work for which muscle is essential. Perhaps this binary conception of strength training is one reason why it isn’t actively encouraged for women with prolapse."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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Made penne alla vodka last night as a dry run for Valentine's Day. It was AMAZING! Guess I'll be making it more often now!

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The recipe: https://www.seriouseats.com/pasta-with-vodka-sauce. We didn't use the blender so it had a lot of great texture.

 ‎· JustDuckie
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maybe I should open theme <s>park</s> restaurant here in Finland.

 ‎· Абрамсы в Химках 1
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Today in peak Dallas news: they're opening a bar near The Sixth Floor Museum, in Dealey Plaza. And they're calling it Jack Ruby's. :-|

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dealey_Plaza

 ‎· JustDuckie
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I mean... https://www.texasmonthly.com/being-texan/9-11-themed-bar-fort-worth/

 ‎· Meg Vmeg 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and linguistics

The Pain of Losing Your First Language | Kristin Wong https://catapult.co/stories/the-pain-of-losing-your-first-language-attrition-bilingualism-kristin-wong

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"There are five other students in this class, all learning Cantonese for someone else—a fiancé or a girlfriend or a girlfriend’s grandparents. I’m sort of here for someone else too. I’m six months pregnant and I tell everyone I’m learning Cantonese so I can teach my kid his roots, teach him where he came from. I want to learn phrases beyond Nei hou? (“hello”) and Ngo gong siu siu gongdongwa (“I speak a little Cantonese”). I’d like to be fluent, but fluency feels impossible. The language apps haven’t worked. YouTube hasn’t worked. Asking my mom to translate phrases over the phone doesn’t seem to work. I give up every time. But here I am, still trying to make it work. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"When I was four years old, my mother and I lived in a one-bedroom apartment in Houston. My aunt lived in the unit below ours, and my grandparents lived between both of us. It was like Melrose Place, only we were a small, quiet Chinese family in a shoddy apartment complex. My grandma taught me, and no one else, a Cantonese dialect called Toisanwa—which she spoke in the village where she grew up in China. My mom sometimes joked that no one knew what Grandma and I were talking about. It was like we had our own secret language. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Genesee says being bilingual changes your brain. Even when you speak as fluently as everyone else, you’re always different, for better or worse. “You function like a native speaker, but the brain processes that underlie your use of English are still different from [monolingual] native speakers,” he says. This is especially true for kids who are exposed to second languages in the first year of their life. And when children learn a second language, they often lose their first one, especially when the second language is English. This happens because the brain inhibits the old language to make room for the new one—it’s a way of adapting. Researchers call this process language attrition. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"I wanted to fit in. I wanted to not be noticed at all. So when my mom asked me questions in Cantonese, I started replying in English. When strangers asked if I spoke Chinese, I shook my head. At dim sum, I refused to order chicken feet. Instead, I asked for the most American-looking food I could find: dan tat, a sweet egg tart that looked like a mini pumpkin pie. It was never my favorite, but I learned to like it."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"I’m trying to learn a language I’ve forgotten, but I’m trying to learn more than a language. I’m excavating memories of the person I used to be, one lesson at a time. I dig up the reflection of my eight-year-old self in the mirror, pushing down her tear-filled slanted eyes. I dig further to find the girl who chewed on chicken feet at dim sum and squeezed loaves of yàuhjagwái when her mother wasn’t looking. I’m searching for the girl who spoke the secret language of her ancestors, a language that my grandmother used when she slapped my arms and pinched the fat of my cheeks and laughed, “Hou dak ji, Kiss-i-tin.” Maybe it’s too late to find that person. But it’s the version of myself that feels most true. And it’s the version of myself I want my son to know. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and history

Women executed 300 years ago as witches in Scotland set to receive pardons https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/dec/19/executed-witches-scotland-pardons-witchcraft-act?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_b-gdnnews&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1639930729

Comment

"From allegations of cursing the king’s ships, to shape-shifting into animals and birds, or dancing with the devil, a satanic panic in early modern Scotland meant that thousands of women were accused of witchcraft in the 16th-18th centuries with many executed. Now, three centuries after the Witchcraft Act was repealed, campaigners are on course to win pardons and official apologies for the estimated 3,837 people – 84% of whom were women – tried as witches, of which two-thirds were executed and burned"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"After a two-year campaign by the Witches of Scotland group, a member’s bill in the Scottish parliament has secured the support of Nicola Sturgeon’s administration to clear the names of those accused, the Sunday Times reported. The move follows a precedent by the Massachusetts House of Representatives in the US that proclaimed victims of the Salem witch trials innocent in 2001."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"With witchcraft a capital crime, the convicted were usually strangled to death then burned at the stake so as to leave no body to bury. Many confessed under torture, which included sleep deprivation, the crushing and pulling out of fingernails, and pricking of the skin with needles and bodkins to see if the accused bled. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Claire Mitchell QC, who leads the Witches of Scotland campaign, said it was seeking pardons, apologies and a national monument to the mainly female victims of the witch-hunts. “Per capita, during the period between the 16th and 18th century, we [Scotland] executed five times as many people as elsewhere in Europe, the vast majority of them women,” she told the Sunday Times. “To put that into perspective, in Salem 300 people were accused and 19 people were executed. We absolutely excelled at finding women to burn in Scotland. Those executed weren’t guilty, so they should be acquitted.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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JUSTICE FOR AGNES NUTTER

 ‎· LibSkrat 5
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» posted to JustDuckie and linguistics

Tend https://therumpus.net/2021/12/tend/

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"The making of bone broth is tedious. It requires tending; it is an investment in the future. When my husband, Mark, traveled to France for a conference, I rejected the boxed shortcut and chose the long way, that well-worn path taken by others throughout history; I chose to conjure my food from bone, vegetable, water, and time. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"On Broth Day 2, I started texting complaints to Mark. It feels like the broth is chronic. I want it to end. My project felt tedious, and boring, tying me to one room of the house because I was still afraid to leave the broth alone. My daughter walked by; wrinkled her nose; and remarked, “That smells strong.” The meat-steam filling the house definitely signaled work. When I finally turned off the stove to strain everything, the house smelled like flesh, the vegetables had turned saggy and sad, and I felt dispirited"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"I poured the liquid into a ceramic mug, sipped it, and spat it out. The French have a word for those three essential vegetables used together as a soup or broth base, mirepoix. I had included carrots and onion but not celery. I understood why there was a word for that particular combination, and I learned the consequence of leaving one of them out. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"In college, I had a jolly, older professor of Latin and ancient Greek who, over wine and cheese at his house, loved to let words devolve and effervesce in his mouth, tending to their changes over time. My favorite was whiskey. He told a story of going to Amsterdam and trying to speak Dutch, but he hesitated to do so before us until he had had a few drinks. As he loosened up his tongue, the Dutch would come out. The word whiskey would rasp and morph into the Scandinavian akvavit, then into the Latin aqua vitae, the water of life. It was a beautiful thing to behold, the word churning through the ages within one man’s imagination and out of his voice box. I could hear the blending of cultures, the Roman, Germanic, and Anglo Saxon, all drunk together, slurring words, becoming one. Our language and gestures invoke ancient histories, bringing the past into the present. We stir the bones. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Was tend from tengo, to stretch and to strive? As I tended to the broth, so many verb tenses washed over my brain, words I had not expected to remember, irregular verbs that refused to be normalized rose up in my memory. But none seemed right for to tend. The internet suggested several origins and meanings in both Old English (attend: to look after) and Latin (to stretch). Tending might have something to do with fire, one explanation offered; perhaps the word shares its beginnings with the notion of fire starting, to set fire to, to kindle, to ignite. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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» posted to JustDuckie and eccentric-strange-news

Mysterious Squid-Headed Statue Appears at Downtown Cemetery - D Magazine https://www.dmagazine.com/frontburner/2021/12/mysterious-squid-headed-statue-appears-at-downtown-cemetery/

Comment

"Until last summer, a Confederate war memorial also stood here. As of Monday morning, a statue that I’m going to tentatively describe as depicting a woman’s figure with the head of a haloed squid had risen in place of the old Confederate soldiers."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"I’d like to tell you that I know what any of it means. I can tell you that T. Boone Pickens, who has been dead for more than two years, probably did not give this to the city of Dallas, as the plaque claims. I can also tell you that I quite like this piece. Dallas is weird. We should embrace it with more squid sculptures making mysterious claims about our early history. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
Comment

This is how all Confederate statues should be replaced.

 ‎· JustDuckie 3
Comment

Our Lady Squidward

 ‎· Micah 3
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Given that the Church of the SubGenius started in Dallas, I kinda wonder if it's a nod to the prairie squid https://subgenius.fandom.com/wiki/Prairie_squid

 ‎· Meg Vmeg 3
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Dallas County reports 2,244 new cases in the last week as pace of COVID-19 spread quickens https://www.dallasnews.com/news/public-health/2021/12/14/2-new-omicron-cases-detected-in-north-texas-pace-of-new-coronavirus-cases-in-dallas-county-quickens/

Comment

"“Allowing this growth in new cases to go unchecked, especially into the holidays and with the highly contagious omicron variant looming, could have substantial consequences in the coming weeks and months if we don’t take steps to curb spread,” Jenkins said."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"The average number of new daily cases in the county for the last two weeks is 333. For the previous 14-day period, the average was 264."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Welp, here we go.

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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January is gonna suuuuuuuuuuuck.

 ‎· LibSkrat 3
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First bookstore dedicated solely to animals opens in East Village https://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2021/12/09/first-bookstore-dedicated-solely-to-animals-opens-in-east-village

Comment

"Owner Cleo Le-Tan opened Pillow-Cat Books in September, and says it’s the first bookstore in the city dedicated primarily to animals. When she’s choosing which books to sell in her shop, there’s only one rule: an animal has to be present. “Or even an animal name, like John Updike’s "Rabbit Run" — it’s not really about rabbits,” Le-Tan said. “People come in sometimes, they’ve read about [the shop] or something, and they’re like, 'This is pushing it, why do you have this in it?'""

 ‎· JustDuckie
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The post right below this is about Penguin Random House. Do those count? :)

 ‎· bentley 1
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@bentleywg: lol :-P

 ‎· JustDuckie
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How Beijing Influences the Influencers https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/12/13/technology/china-propaganda-youtube-influencers.html

Comment

"State-run news outlets and local governments have organized and funded pro-Beijing influencers’ travel, according to government documents and the creators themselves. They have paid or offered to pay the creators. They have generated lucrative traffic for the influencers by sharing videos with millions of followers on YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. With official media outlets’ backing, the creators can visit and film in parts of China where the authorities have obstructed foreign journalists’ reporting."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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I am shocked, shocked I tell you, that most of these idiots are white men.

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and eccentric-strange-news

Fruitcake Fraud | Official Trailer | discovery+ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_0f0O814co

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Oh, Texas.

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
Comment

"Over the course of nine years, a whopping $17 million was embezzled from Corsicana, Texas’s revered Collin Street Bakery, the world’s most famous purveyor of Fruitcake. This documentary takes viewers to the heart of the small town rocked by the scam. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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» posted to JustDuckie and eccentric-strange-news

Brewed with spaghetti, M&Ms, maple syrup: Martin House releases beer in honor of ‘Elf’ https://www.dallasnews.com/food/drinks/2021/12/06/brewed-with-spaghetti-mms-maple-syrup-martin-house-releases-beer-in-honor-of-elf/

Comment

"Cotton-Headed Ninny-Muggins is brewed with maple syrup, lactose, chocolate, marshmallows, M&Ms and spaghetti. Yes, you read that right. Spaghetti. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Shugg Cole, the brewery’s marketing director, said Martin House was considering how to ring in the holiday season when employees got the idea to brew a beer in honor of Elf, the classic Christmas movie starring Will Ferrell. “We elves try to stick to the four main food groups: candy, candy canes, candy corns and syrup,” Buddy the Elf says in the movie, while pouring maple syrup on his spaghetti. So does Cotton-Headed Ninny-Muggins, at 8% ABV, taste like spaghetti? Nope, not really. It tastes like a maple stout, Cole said. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

ew and also ew. no thank you.

 ‎· LibSkrat 1
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Historians Discover Three Wise Men Completely Ignored Mary’s Baby Registry https://reductress.com/post/historians-discover-three-wise-men-completely-ignored-marys-baby-registry/

Comment

"“Sure, it was pretty cool that the three wise men located their position solely using the North star,” Johnston said. “But that doesn’t make it any less annoying that they all blatantly ignored the registry – even the really cheap stuff that was easy to find pretty much anywhere.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
Comment

"Mary had originally asked for a crib, a stroller, a bottle, a few sets of clothes, and a changing mat, but it seems that no one got the memo, or they all just deliberately ignored it. “Really? Gold, frankincense, and myrrh?” a new translation from Mary’s recently uncovered tablets read. “What the hell am I supposed to do with these?” "

 ‎· JustDuckie 3
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@eyebrowsonfire: The guys were actually based. They understood that the mother would have to run from the authorities with the baby pretty soon, so they brought some compact, anonymous, widely accepted store of value.

 ‎· 9000 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and nature

Meet an Ecologist Who Works for God (and Against Lawns) https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/03/climate/climate-change-biodiversity.html

Comment

"Mr. Jacobs is an ecologist and Catholic who believes that humans can fight climate change and help repair the world right where they live. While a number of urban dwellers and suburbanites also sow native plants to that end, Mr. Jacobs says people need something more: To reconnect with nature and experience the sort of spiritual transcendence he feels in a forest, or on a mountain, or amid the bounty of his own yard. It’s a feeling that, for him, is akin to feeling close to God."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"“We need something greater than people,” said Mr. Jacobs, who worked at the Nature Conservancy for nine years before joining a nonprofit that tackles invasive species — plants, animals and pathogens that squeeze out native varieties. “We need a calling outside of ourselves, to some sort of higher power, to something higher than ourselves to preserve life on earth.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
Comment

"About 20 years ago, he began compiling quotes from the Bible, saints and popes that expound on the sanctity of Earth and its creatures, and posting them online. He considered naming the project after St. Francis of Assisi, the go-to saint for animals and the environment. But, not wanting to impose another European saint on American land, he instead named it after Kateri Tekakwitha, a 17th Century Algonquin-Mohawk woman who converted to Catholicism as a teenager and, in 2012, became the first Native American to be canonized. “Kateri would’ve known every plant, would’ve collected food, and would’ve been very connected with the land,” Mr. Jacobs said."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
Comment

"Linda Covello, who lives down the road, and who has also kept a dead tree in place because woodpeckers regularly nest there, described Ms. Jacobs as “some sort of Galadriel from Lord of the Rings.” “You’ve got your landscaping people out here,” Ms. Covello said, “But she’s the lady of the woods, the goddess of the woods.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and fairytales

Thy God Loki - The Offing https://theoffingmag.com/insight/thy-god-loki/

Comment

" I kept thinking about Loki and mental health, Loki and queerness, Loki and liminal gods, Loki and misfits. I had multiple cinematic dreams about him losing fights. In the weirdest one, Thor chained him down and beat him until they began to resemble each other, Thor deranged and villainous, Loki noble and martyred. I would make a psychiatrist appointment, I decided. I would go back on medication. But my therapist’s response surprised me. “You’re the second client to come in talking about that show,” she said. “The other person can’t get it out of their head, either.” Apparently, Loki had managed to twang some deeply resonant string in its viewers. I hadn’t expected that at all."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"I began to suspect I was neurodivergent—a term for normal cognitive variations usually considered disorders—around the time I began to suspect I was queer. I began to wonder if my mental health issues, depression and anxiety and OCD and old traumas and a bunch of miscellaneous symptoms, weren’t a haphazard pile of discrete problems, but manifestations of a deeper root cause. As Jenara Nerenberg points out in her book Divergent Mind, the makeup of the human mind is slippery and diverse, with near-infinite possibilities, and what seems like a disorder is often only our society’s failure to understand and accommodate it. Many neurodivergent people report feeling immense relief when they finally figure out what’s going on with their minds, and I suppose I did feel some of that, but mostly I felt deflated. My strangeness had always made me feel monstrous, and now I knew there was no fix and no cure. I would always be like this."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"When we meet him, Loki is an outsider, part of the royal family of Asgard but hovering unhappily on the edge of Thor’s friend group. No one likes him much, and he has a history of acting out. Loki’s feelings of inadequacy, of being inexplicably out of sync, are explained when he finds out that he’s actually a kind of primordial giant called a Jotunn, raised to believe he was Asgardian. His secret adoption, he learns, was a political move intended to strengthen ties between Asgard and Jotunheim, now rendered obsolete by the breakdown of the peace treaty between the two kingdoms. Making matters infinitely worse, the Asgardians hate and demonize the Jotunns. Loki finds out that in the eyes of his people he is literally a monster."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"There’s a poignant moment in Loki, based on one of the original Norse myths, when an Asgardian named Sif confronts him with a lock of hair he cut from her head while she was sleeping. “You deserve to be alone,” she hisses, “and you always will be.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"In one story, Loki saves himself from being beheaded by telling his executioners that while he did technically promise them his head, he never told them they could touch his neck. Like other tricksters, Loki survives because his mind works differently than those around him, noticing details and making connections that others miss. In that sense, cunning isn’t far removed from neurodivergence. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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Disability Status Shouldn’t Have a Hierarchy | s.e. smith https://catapult.co/stories/se-smith-an-unquiet-mind-disability-status-shouldnt-have-a-hierarchy

Comment

"As a culture, we love few things quite so much as being unpleasant to people who are not behaving as we think they should. In the world of disability, such behavior can be especially routine—as, for example, when nondisabled people vigorously shame people for using disabled parking spaces because they don’t “look disabled” or the disabled placard is clearly “someone else’s” and you’re “taking resources away from real disabled people.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Within the disability community, a different current has emerged. The community itself has long been plagued by what some, such as activist Ed Roberts, term a “hierarchy of disability,” with various kinds of disability status “ranking” higher than others. Intellectually and developmentally disabled people are often placed at the bottom, which has big implications: “We are not like them,” say other disabled people, and they exclude their needs and voices from disability conversations. The hierarchy is an ugly, grotesque thing. The treatment of people with nonevident disabilities is part of that ugliness, which implies that evident physical disabilities are more “valid” than nonevident disabilities. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"A person with, say, Crohn’s disease who wants a cure is not telling other people how to feel but may be shamed for openly talking about the distress their disability causes them. Similarly, someone with a new impairment, such as a traumatic amputation, may experience grief, suffering, and other emotions; pushing that person to feel differently only alienates them. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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As ‘Nutcracker’ Returns, Companies Rethink Depictions of Asians https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/29/arts/dance/nutcracker-asian-stereotypes-rethinking.html

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"A new character is featured in the Land of Sweets in Pacific Northwest Ballet’s “Nutcracker” this year: Green Tea Cricket, a springy, superhero-like figure meant to counter stereotypes of Chinese culture. Tulsa Ballet, hoping to dispel outdated portrayals of Asians, is infusing its production with elements of martial arts, choreographed by a Chinese-born dancer. And Boston Ballet is staging a new spectacle: a pas de deux inspired by traditional Chinese ribbon dancing."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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(I do think the bug feet are cute. Keep those.)

 ‎· LibSkrat 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and history

Rare Prohibition 'grape brick' that turns into wine on show - The Drinks Business https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2017/07/rare-prohibition-grape-brick-that-turns-into-wine/

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(from 2017)

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Under the Volstead Act, whose rules regulated Prohibition, grapes could be grown, but only if they were being used for non-alcoholic consumption. Furthermore, if the winemaker sold grapes to someone, aware they were going to use them to make wine, they themselves could be jailed."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"It meant that in selling their grape bricks, winemakers had to be able to maintain deniability that their product could be used to produce alcohol. To get around this, winemakers ensured that their grape bricks carried a warning not to leave it in water for too long in case, heaven forbid, it should begin fermenting and turn to wine. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 3
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"The warning in fact also served as an instruction manual, specifically advising the buyer “not to leave that jug in the cool cupboard for 21 days, or it would turn into wine”. "

 ‎· JustDuckie 4
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Into Thin Air (The Women on Flight 305) https://therumpus.net/2021/11/into-thin-air-the-women-on-flight-305/

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"Growing up in Washington State meant that I had more than my fair share of historical boogeymen to look out for, and for a tongue-tied shut-in like me, all scraggly bangs and ghost stories, there was no greater honor than learning that my family was connected to Washington’s very own legend. My great-uncle, William Scott, was one of the pilots on Flight 305 in 1971; in some small way, I was a part of that history, and like so many others, I absorbed the predominant narrative that elevated his cult folklore status—one that marveled at Cooper’s ability to disappear completely, baffling the government for decades, all mystery and no substance. It wasn’t until some time later when I stumbled across the anecdote about Florence Schaffner’s dismissal of the ransom note—a bland little piece of information, a bit of human interest to pad out narrative space between the setup and the story’s explosive hook—that I considered the story from a different point of view. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"It’s impossible to ignore Florence Schaffner’s weariness and the everyday nature of such a proposition. Men handing her unsolicited notes, making demands for attention, were such a commonplace part of her job that she had to be told twice to take a bomb threat seriously. Even before Cooper boarded her plane, Schaffner had taken to wearing wigs to disguise herself and avoid the unwanted advances of aggressively lascivious customers. The only thing different about Dan Cooper was his bomb."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"Much of what is written about the case is drenched in Pan Am-era nostalgia, vaguely reminiscent of a time when air travel was glamorous, eagerly feeding audiences an adventure fantasy with a veneer of sexy intrigue. When they are mentioned at all, Scaffner and Mucklow become something akin to caricature: the young stewardesses, helpless and captive in the thrall of an older, more powerful man who controlled their every move for a number of hours. Most of these histories gloss over or outright ignore the few pieces of information that we know about these women—Schaffner’s history with aggressive passengers who led her to disguise herself on flights, how she feared Cooper “[taking] her hard by the wrist and raping her right there” after she read his note. How she imagined her parents watching the situation unfold on the news in real time, wondering if their daughter would make it out alive. Her feelings about the night she was held hostage at ten thousand feet are always eclipsed by pages and pages of suspect names and speculation on what man would have the audacity—the balls—to pull off such a heist. The experiences of the women who actually interacted with him are always an afterthought, a bit of narrative padding before the story launches off into a thrilling whodunnit adventure."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"It wasn’t just the bomb threat on the cocktail napkin. It was the fact that Florence Schaffner almost didn’t register it. It’s the fact that Cooper’s folk-hero persona has largely blotted out his real intention to do harm in order to get money. In a world where every crime story and serial killer bildungsroman can be condensed neatly into a fifty-minute podcast with time for ad breaks, it’s easy to forget that these aren’t characters, but real people whose lives will never be the same because of the act of a self-interested man who has had the privilege of living on in anonymity. In doing so, we make the crime something less than real, something without victims or consequences, just a collection of names and dates and timelines without meaning. The experiences and livelihood of the victims of the crime are caricatured, frozen, defined by others for the rest of time."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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Searching for Home in the South with Carson McCullers | Alex Sujong Laughlin https://catapult.co/stories/searching-for-home-in-the-south-with-carson-mccullers-alex-sujong-laughlin

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"Y’all was easier to type than to say aloud. “I’ll meet y’all there in 20,” I texted my college friends as we made plans for dinner. It was easier to feign a casual fluency with that word over text, as if my fingers just glided over the letters on my keyboard and elided the transitive letters out of habit, as if I spoke this word every day, as if I’d said this word my whole life. I was twenty-two and living in Washington, DC, which is technically south of the Mason-Dixon, but Southern In Name Only; order a sweet tea within the district and you’ll get an iced tea with a pack of sugar on the side. Not that I ever ordered sweet tea. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"I first heard of Carson McCullers, the Southern writer, while eating a convenience store egg sandwich during a break in my lifeguard training in 2007. I was fifteen, and my family had just moved back to Georgia from Washington State. I was horrified at the heat and humidity, which created heat indexes I didn’t know were possible. I had been accepted to Columbus High School, which I would be entering as a sophomore, but because of the differences in curriculum standards, I would be taking freshman biology and the mysteriously titled Foundations of Knowledge, a required freshman course. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Regardless of what individual sophomore boys thought of her, Columbus High loved Carson. My teachers talked about her like she was a beloved cousin, an odd bird who had grown up only a few blocks away, a daughter of the city who was beloved despite her strangeness and maybe even because of it. I carried my copy of Carson’s The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter with me on these lonely walks around Columbus High’s campus and imagined Carson walking the same routes. Conjuring her ghost to walk beside me in those courtyards was a small comfort when I felt like I had spectacularly failed at being a normal teenager; I was too afraid to make small talk, but maybe I could follow Carson out of this town and write books that would be displayed in the school library too."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"At twenty-two, I imagined my arrival in DC would be a homecoming, that I would quickly nestle in among the NPR-listening liberals and Ann Taylor–clad women and be recognized as one of their own. I would sip wine at Capitol Hill parties and mingle with the most powerful people in the country—or at least their assistants. I started a job at a political magazine with an office at the Watergate. I realized many of my coworkers had never been to the South; they had grown up on the coasts and graduated from private schools. Between their polite nods and questions, I realized how I looked to them: a lucky expat from a land of backwardness and provincialism. I played up my Georgia horror stories: the Confederate-themed bar downtown, the roommate’s parents who called me a Chinaman, the covert and overt ways I learned to hate myself. My stories were a fascinating glimpse into another world, but that didn’t mean I was welcome in theirs. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Even as a child, Carson didn’t fit into Columbus; she preferred pants instead of skirts and dresses and kept her hair cut short, eschewing her birthright as a Southern belle to play piano and write plays that she and her brother performed in the living room. Because she was often sick with pneumonia, she missed a lot of school, and, according to Shapland, the closest relationships in her early life were with adults—aunts, grandparents, nannies and maids, and eventually her piano teacher, Mary Tucker. In other official accounts of Carson’s life and work, she was characterized as a funny girl with a complicated marriage and a tendency to develop deep, obsessive friendships with women. It never occurred to me that these friendships might be euphemistic obfuscations of what was really happening. "

 ‎· JustDuckie

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