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The Sephora Girls are Making Me Feel Bad https://medium.com/s/story/the-sephora-girls-are-making-me-feel-bad-8479e4a1aeed

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"“What’s your skin care regimen?” she asks [unjustifiably, I mentally accuse her of thinking it’s spelled “regime”]. “Umm, I . . . wash?” I say. “But I mean, like, what’s your regimen?” she repeats, enunciating the word “regimen.” “I mean, what products do you use? And in what order? What’s your routine?” she tries (in case I didn’t understand “regimen,” I guess). “Soap,” I say. “I wash my face with soap, and then I’m done. After the soap I don’t do anything else. That is the end of my routine. After the soap part, I go to work.” This conversation is getting weird and uncomfortable, but I feel like she’s set the tone that we need to be very precise."

 ‎· JustDuckie 3
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LOL I have had this exact conversation with someone at Ulta. This is why all my makeup comes from CVS.

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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On the one hand, lol. On the other, I genuinely gasped aloud at the "soap" answer

 ‎· Soup 1
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Petco says ‘all leashed pets are welcome.' Then a couple brought in their 1,600-pound steer. https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/03/22/petco-says-all-leashed-pets-are-welcome-then-couple-brought-their-pound-steer-named-oliver/?utm_term=.6822762c9f89

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"As Oliver tilted his wide set of horns — measuring nine and a half feet from tip to tip — to the side to avoid hitting the automatic sliding doors, Browning kept repeating, “Easy, easy!” When he made it through the second series of doors, the steer was greeted with pure joy from the patrons and employees, including smiles, laughter and a welcome worthy of any other customer or animal of the pet store retailer: “Welcome to South Texas Petco.” “They welcomed Oliver the African Watusi with open arms,” Browning wrote."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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Wow. I'm speechless. And amused.

 ‎· ☺☼✿jilli is ✿ ☼☺
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Google ‘Florida Man’ and your birthday — and see what you get https://www.miamiherald.com/news/state/florida/article228217004.html

Comment

"Florida Man never sleeps, never goes on vacation (though sometimes vacationers turn into Florida Men) and never fails to amuse. Now, Florida Man is a social media challenge. “Google Florida Man followed by your birthday and tell me what you get” seemed to start on Tumblr and spread to Twitter and Facebook Wednesday night and Thursday morning. Florida Man and birthday has become Throwback Thursday’s new trending novelty."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Florida man rigged the door to his home with devices designed to electrocute his pregnant estranged wife" ... "DEVICES" Y'ALL "DEVICES"

 ‎· MoTO Babycakes 4
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This Native Jewelry Designer Combats Stereotypes Through Art | Adrienne Keene https://catapult.co/stories/kristen-dorsey-native-jewelry-designer-fighting-stereotypes-art-adrienne-keene

Comment

"Kristen’s work doesn’t fit the stereotypes of Native jewelry, which tend to be built off Navajo, Pueblo, and other southwestern aesthetics—such as silverwork that feature turquoise or stone and shell inlays; Navajo squash blossom necklaces with their characteristic horseshoe-shaped center designs; or designs featuring stampwork, where small images are hammered into silver using metal “stamps.” For most non-Natives, if they think of “Indian jewelry,” and aren’t thinking of beadwork, they’re thinking of this type of design. Kirsten instead relies on her Chickasaw culture, her knowledge built through an undergraduate degree in Native American Studies and a BFA. Each of her pieces is deeply researched, tells a story, and is grounded in some aspect of her people."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"One of my favorite pieces I own from Kristen is a large rose gold statement cuff bracelet, called the “sky serpent cuff.” In southeastern tribal traditions, we have stories of a feathered serpent who lives in the sky world, who is responsible for thunderstorms and waterways. Kristen hand-sculpted this bracelet to have scales, but scales that somehow are also reminiscent of feathers. The cuff narrows to a scalloped triangular point on my wrist, making me feel like Cherokee Wonder Woman when I wear it. I tell the story behind the design to everyone who compliments the bracelet, making it a moment of cultural connection—as well as a beautiful cuff. But the swirling lines and modern curves of Kristen’s work don’t fit the mold created largely by the white collectors of Native jewelry. She knows that most patrons and prospective customers have a very narrow idea of what “Native” jewelry entails, but enjoys breaking those preconceived ideas. “People really want jewelry to fit into a box, and Native people into a box, in this safe stereotype space,” says Kristen. “I have fun, because I defy every single stereotype anyone has ever held about a Native jeweler, or Native art, or Native people. And so, I enjoy just breaking those stereotypes, just completely smashing them.” "

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"Later, another man makes a comment about her light-colored eyes, and asks, “Are you a speck of Indian?” These questions are nothing new for Kristen. She thinks about the concept of “blood quantum”—how much “Native blood” one possesses—often. It’s a theme that plays out in some of her work. She has a striking one-of-a-kind necklace she calls “Blood Bling,” which is a photo-etching of her mother’s Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) card. The CDIB is the size of a business card and etched in fine silver, framed in a baroque-style bronze frame, on a heavy gold plated chain. Around the frame are small red, white, and blue cubic zirconia, symbolizing American flag colors. Kristen purposely made the necklace look overly European in style as commentary on the origins of the concept, while the fake stones and heavy imitation gold are meant to point out how superficial this system really is."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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I really like her designs - there are a lot of very cool pieces on her site. Tempted to save up for some of those necklaces.

 ‎· Jennifer D. 1
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» posted to JustDuckie and nature

Catapult | Why These Seals Left New York—And Why They Came Back | Lenora Todaro https://catapult.co/stories/why-these-seals-left-new-yorkand-why-they-came-back

Comment

"Each time I see a wild creature it’s another splash of wonder, a zing of joy. “See its nose,” Willow says. “When they’re feeding they’re generally solitary; when they’re hauling out to rest and sun themselves they like to be with others.” Then, bird distractions: northern shoveler, lesser scaup. “A handsome little duck. Purple head, white flank, yellow eyes, blue beak. Unusual to see it alone.” Willow’s recitation of characteristics are like found poems. The seal bobs, swims underwater, pops up, flashes large, dreamy eyes. Then it’s gone."

 ‎· JustDuckie 1
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"“The biggest fear I have,” says Reynolds, “is that yes, there are seals here, but people want to get close and take selfies. They think they will do tricks for them like sea lions. But harbor seals aren’t friendly like sea lions; they’re sensitive and don’t like people getting close. I worry that people, wind surfers, boaters—if they get too close regularly, the seals will abandon the area. That happened in one place in San Francisco. They never came back.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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tomoko ikegai / ikg inc lights chinese bookstore with fluttering sheets of paper https://www.designboom.com/architecture/tomoko-ikegai-ikg-yjy-maike-centre-flagship-store-xian-china-03-13-2019/

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"the area around the open spiral staircase functions as a courtyard, with a bright floor and mirrors on the ceiling to distinguish it from other spaces. the void above the staircase is illuminated by lights that resemble fluttering sheets of paper, while the stage at its base features a stone map of xian and its surroundings, offering an ideal space for events."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"on the 50-meter-long ‘book street,’ a low ceiling, dark colors for the floor and ceiling, and display boxes set in bookshelves come together to create a subdued gallery-like atmosphere. the distinctive artwork incorporated throughout the store is all original, commissioned to reflect themes appropriate to the location. the overall effect is a tasteful, classic environment that reflects china’s long and proud history, where visitors can relax, unwind, and enjoy reading the vast array of books on offer."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Bushy Tails And Old Cookbooks — THE BITTER SOUTHERNER https://bittersoutherner.com/bushy-tails-and-old-cookbooks

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"Small wonder, then, that “mad squirrel disease" brought out tired jokes about rural rubes. To hunt squirrel was to hunt something far more meager than the majestic deer (who would mount a squirrel’s head on a wall?). It’s a small reward that takes a lot of time and effort and isn’t that different from something that can be bought. It seems desperate. Squirrel — an animal that also lived across the Northeast — became tied to those who didn’t have money, who wouldn’t (or couldn’t) adapt to the grocery store, who, either through desperate necessity or twisted preference, ate the animals that ate the trash of the rest of the country. It became a Southern cliché."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Possum is far more Southern than squirrel — in habitat, in preparation, and in re-evaluation. Food historian Michael Twitty has described the birth of Southern food as “European dishes full of Native American ingredients” being “shaped by black hands.” Roast possum is such a dish. And besides being shaped by black hands, it’s been warped by white imagination."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"The racist ideas around the possum, like so many racist ideas, came from slavery. "Possum were the creatures most likely to be abroad after dark when slaves were able to go hunting, so they were a frequent catch,” Jessica B. Harris writes in The Welcome Table, before giving her recipe for possum and sweet potatoes, which she calls “perhaps the most evocative of all of the African-American main dishes from the period of enslavement.” "The meat is quite succulent,” she continues, “and indeed many a nineteenth-century stereotype hinged on the assertion that African-Americans, though offered other meats, preferred possum.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"What we eat is part of who we are. We form our identities for ourselves and our homes based on the meals we have there. The foods we claim as our own are our links to the land and our past. But this changes. When we decide a dish is or isn’t food, we also make judgments about the people who eat it. Sometimes we forget the people who used to cook it. Chefs preparing squirrel or other small game today recognize that it’s possible to adapt to the new a little too quickly — that we can forget things along the way. But revivals and nostalgia too often overlook the harder truths of the past. When a food comes back, we should understand why it went away. It’s the difference between connecting to the past and trying to recreate it, between looking backward and moving forward — between eating possum and just telling other people to."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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A Bar for Spain’s Radical Right, Run by a Chinese Immigrant https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/17/world/europe/spain-franco-far-right-vox.html

Comment

"Mr. Chen has done his best to ready himself for a Franquist resurrection. He has played host to Franco’s descendants at the bar; a group photograph of the meeting hangs on the wall opposite the civil war map. Until his neighbors complained, he flew the flag of Franco-era Spain from his apartment balcony, which overlooks the cafe’s southern front. His 4-year-old son, meanwhile, is named Franco-Xi."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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:-|

 ‎· JustDuckie
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I keep thinking that guy in front is Roger Delgado as The Master https://www.google.com/search?q=roger+delgado+master

 ‎· bentley 2
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In Texas, We Try to Indict Whoever Finds the College Admissions Cheating https://www.dallasobserver.com/news/in-boston-they-indict-cheaters-we-try-to-indict-people-who-expose-cheating-11607893

Comment

"Four years ago Dallas businessman Wallace Hall, a member of the University of Texas System Board of Regents, uncovered evidence, confirmed in a later third-party investigation, of deep-rooted admissions cheating at UT Austin and the UT law school. Abbott, then Texas attorney general, banded together with a pack of angry baying wolves in the Legislature to shut Hall up and prevent him from exposing the full extent of the scandal to the public. Why was the Legislature so rabidly committed to muzzling Hall? Because the particular kind of cheating Hall uncovered had a lot to do with Texas legislators shoehorning their own kids and kids of influential constituents into UT undergrad and the law school in exchange for legislative favors to then president of the university, the late Bill Powers."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
Comment

"In coverage of the current scandal alleged by the U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, much of the commentary includes hand-wringing over income disparity in the nation and bad behavior by a wealthy aristocracy. If that’s the answer, then we’re going to have to expand the definition of aristocracy. It will have to include special friends of Democratic state Sen. Judith Zaffirini of the 21st District in Laredo. So successful were Zaffirini and other powerful legislators in persuading Powers to grant admission to their personal favorites that the law school, always known as one of the nation’s top, started getting more ink for churning out graduates who couldn’t pass the bar exam."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Reporter Jon Cassidy of Watchdog.org developed a database of UT law grads in 2006-13 who failed the bar exam in multiple tries and came up with the following interesting detail: “Of nearly 2,700 UT Law grads,” Cassidy reported, “just 197 needed to retake the test. I found 90 who failed it twice. And I found 29 who failed it three times or more. “That last group of 29 included Zaffirini’s son Carlos, as well as Jeffrey Carona, son of Republican state Sen. John Carona, and Ryan Pitts, son of Rep. Jim Pitts, the House Appropriations Committee chairman. It also included these five: a lobbyist who’d worked for House Speaker Joe Straus, a legislative director, the former chief of staff for a congressman, the son of a major Zaffirini donor and state Rep. Eddie Rodriguez.” I don’t know about you, but that doesn’t sound to me like a bunch of arrogant Waspy hoity-toits. It doesn’t sound like sons and daughters of movie stars or the spoiled offspring of entitled tech titans. Most of the people involved in the Texas admissions cheating scandal uncovered by Hall always sounded to me more like your good old American smorgasbord of main chance slicks. Open that door one crack, and those slicks will squeeze through."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

There's gonna be shedloads of this all over the country. We'll probably find it at MPOW. Public funding of universities is generally a good thing, and to be preferred over the present situation... but yeah, there are totally pitfalls to it and this is one.

 ‎· LibSkrat 1
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» posted to JustDuckie, nature, and science

4 Canadian wolves air-dropped in US national park to deal with moose | Fox News https://www.foxnews.com/science/4-canadian-wolves-captured-air-dropped-in-us-national-park-to-help-restore-population

Comment

"The wolves are being reintroduced to the island to help control the moose population, estimated to be near 1,500. If the moose herd is not kept in check, the animals will continue overeating the island’s shrubs and trees and increase their chances of mass starvation, CBC reported. The arrival of the Canadian wolves boosted the park's wolf total to eight – four males and four females – including the last two survivors of a dwindling population that had occupied the park for about 70 years. Four wolves from Minnesota were brought to the park last fall, but one died and another left for the mainland across an ice bridge formed during February’s polar vortex, FOX9 Minneapolis reported."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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they are, but my understanding is that wolves hunt in a pack, so they would outnumber the lone moose they are trying to kill

 ‎· Courtney F 3
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An Irish Blessing for 2019 - McSweeney’s Internet Tendency https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/an-irish-blessing-for-2019

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"May the wind be always at your back and of insufficient speed to require creation of a Category 6. May the gerrymander in which your home lies be amenable to your interests. May the beefs of your generation’s rappers be diverting."

 ‎· JustDuckie 2
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"May the ratio of your likes to your replies be always in your favor."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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"May Cardi B offer to dogwalk your enemies."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Chinese tourist asking for directions scolds Singaporean for his poor Mandarin, he sends her the wrong way https://shanghai.ist/2019/03/15/chinese-tourist-asking-for-directions-scolds-singaporean-for-his-poor-mandarin-he-sends-her-the-wrong-way/

Comment

"Showing why it’s always important to be polite when asking for directions in an unfamiliar place, a Singaporean guy has described why he decided to send one Chinese visitor off in the wrong direction. In a Twitter post, Timothy Bon says that he was approached by a Chinese woman at the train station asking directions to 海湾舫. Unfamiliar with the Chinese names of Singapore’s MRT stations, Timothy asked the woman to clarify. To this, the woman snapped back: “You are Chinese but you can’t speak Chinese, aren’t you embarrassed?” In response, Timothy pointed the way towards Tuak Link, a station located on the opposite end of Singapore."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

god bless technology, I use google maps and apps like that when I travel, no threat of being impolite to an app of course.

 ‎· SaeedTheGiraffe ? 1
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» posted to JustDuckie, history, and science

A History of the Iberian Peninsula, as Told by Its Skeletons https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/science/iberia-prehistory-dna.html

Comment

"Along with historical records and archaeological digs, researchers now have a new lens on Iberia’s past: DNA preserved in the region’s ancient skeletons. Archaeologists and geneticists are extracting genetic material spanning not just Iberia’s written history but its prehistory, too. “We wanted to bridge the ancient populations and the modern populations,” said Iñigo Olalde, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Olalde is the lead author of a paper published on Thursday in Science that analyzes the DNA of 271 ancient Iberians."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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All these deep studies just remind me the exposition of Kunstkamera in Saint-Petersburg (aka Ethnographic museum of Peter I), where in dusty show-case lays a lonely skull and on its wide forehead is written in Tsars' time spelling with indelible pencil "Lithuanian" (Литвинъ).

 ‎· Truls Naids 1
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Beto O'Rourke Has Announced He Will Run For President In 2020 https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/katherinemiller/beto-orourke-president-2020-primary

Comment

"O'Rourke has gone from a little-known congressman to a national political figure. Few expected him, or any Democrat, to do well in Texas against Cruz. But O'Rourke generated widespread enthusiasm in his Senate campaign and raised tens of millions of dollars in small donations as he traveled to every part of Texas — reigniting, in many places, a dormant Democratic Party."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

I wish I could get excited about this.

 ‎· Meg Vmeg
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» posted to JustDuckie, nature, and science

Wolves lead, dogs follow -- And both cooperate with humans -- ScienceDaily https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190314101334.htm

Comment

"A recent study by Vetmeduni Vienna, published in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that the ability to work with people lies not so much within dogs themselves but in the "wolf within the dog" -- that is to say, in very specific behavioural characteristics that dogs share with wolves. The study tested the extent to which dogs and grey wolves collaborate with humans in order to solve certain tasks. The findings show that both dogs and wolves cooperate intensively with humans and are equally successful, although the animals attain their goals in different ways."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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» posted to JustDuckie, nature, and science

Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence -- ScienceDaily https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190313160815.htm

Comment

""We have known for some time that hungry animals will tolerate the presence of predators in order to forage and avoid starvation, and that phenomenon, called the 'starvation-predation hypothesis,' is supported by our research," says Brendan Oates, now with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, who conducted the research as a UW graduate student. "In this case, close proximity of wolves does cause moose to move, but not enough to drive them from their preferred habitats -- especially late in the winter.""

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Scorpios most likely to get check-ups - Taipei Times http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2019/03/13/2003711405

Comment

"Scorpios are the most likely to visit Cheng Ching Hospital in Taichung for health checkups, the hospital’s Executive Health Management Center said on Monday. The findings were based on a study of the medical records of 20,000 people who used the center’s medical services over the past three years, it said."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"People born under the zodiac signs Scorpio, Virgo, Sagittarius, Libra and Pisces were the top five most likely to go for health checkups, accounting for 9.6 percent, 9 percent, 9.95 percent, 9.92 percent and 8.86 percent of visits respectively, Chiang said. Scorpio, Cancer and Pisces — the zodiac signs associated with water — are the most attentive to their health, followed by the earth signs of Taurus, Virgo and Capricorn; the fire signs of Aries, Leo and Sagittarius; and the air signs of Gemini, Libra and Aquarius, he added."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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The 2018(ish) Hater’s Guide To The Williams-Sonoma Catalog https://theconcourse.deadspin.com/the-2018-ish-hater-s-guide-to-the-williams-sonoma-cata-1832646809

Comment

"I must confess that I’m a bit late to the holiday this winter, and that is because, as befitting an American Christmas, everything got in my fucking way. I couldn’t drive anywhere this Christmas because there was too much traffic. I couldn’t buy any presents because every store was packed. I couldn’t cook anything because all the markets were barren. I couldn’t even find a Williams-Sonoma catalog to make fun of because—and this is true—I was mysteriously taken off the company’s mailing list (investigate?). And every time I went to a brick-and-mortar location to ask for a copy in person, they were curiously out of stock (INVESTIGATE!!!!). They offered me a catalog from the Home branch of the store instead, which I summarily threw into a nearby oil barrel fire tended to by a local hobo."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Will any of that stop me from celebrating a proper Christmas, even if I’m 10 weeks late? Fuck and no, it won’t. We are GOING to have a Christmas in this house and I’ll murder any humbugging motherfucker who dares to stand in my way…"

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

FINALLY :D :D :D

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Waffle House Vistas — THE BITTER SOUTHERNER https://bittersoutherner.com/waffle-house-vistas

Comment

" What compelled me to spend the better part of 2018 traveling throughout the southeastern United States with the sole purpose of visiting Waffle House restaurants? I didn't do it as a testament to Waffle House’s cultural importance in the South. Nor did I do it because of my affinity toward Waffle House. I did it because I wanted to see through each restaurant’s windows. I wanted to see the surrounding architecture, catalog adjacent businesses, and understand the public and commercial space around each restaurant. I also wanted to ask questions about our society and our social, economic, and political divisions. The resulting photography project, “Waffle House Vistas,” collects images that document Southern communities as seen through the windows of Waffle Houses. In each instance, the point of view is the customer’s. Each photograph looks out from booths and chairs, making the viewer a witness to intertwined narratives of poverty, transience, and politics. "

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Waffle House does not care how much you are worth, what you look like, where you are from, what your political beliefs are, or where you've been so long as you respect the unwritten rules of Waffle House: Be kind, be respectful, and don't overstay when others are waiting for a table. Besides, everyone who has ever stepped foot in a Waffle House has a story to tell: Perhaps it involves a late-night study session in college or a joyous pit stop on the way home from a concert or sporting event. Maybe it was a bad breakup over waffles or an early morning breakfast with your bridal party before your wedding. For me, it is the first time my son tried a chocolate chip waffle. The look on his face when he realized that chocolate and syrup taste great together was one of pure delight and discovery. Or the first time my father took me to a Waffle House around the age of 12. I sat at the counter mesmerized, watching the cooks sling hash browns and respond to shouted orders in what seemed like a secret language. These photographs require that personal relationship. I don’t set the stage for where these photographs are made so much as I witness the greater context of the interaction. Instead, the circumstances are gleaned from the viewer’s past experiences and personal relationship with Waffle House."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

The one in Mobile puzzles me. Everywhere else is as expected: a highway exit surrounded by motels and gas stations. But the one in Mobile has sidewalks, trees, pedestrians, maybe even houses: is it in a residential area?

 ‎· bentley 1
Comment

@bentleywg Good point. I wonder if it might be just off of a college campus. That intersection looks very campus-y to me.

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

@eyebrowsonfire: 1851 Government St, Mobile, AL 36606

 ‎· bentley 1
Avatar for eyebrowsonfire

What If You Can’t Afford “A Room of One’s Own”? – Electric Literature https://electricliterature.com/what-if-you-cant-afford-a-room-of-one-s-own-120806c0becc

Comment

"I know half a dozen published authors who’ve had to rely on food stamps. The seedy poverty of the author has been a cliché for centuries. We find the figure of the poor writer already in the medieval era, in the form of poet-clerics called “goliards,” who begged and sang ribald songs in taverns as they wandered from monastery to monastery. Hundreds of years later, in the Beat Generation, the type survived with no essential change. Now a new generation of writers are confronting ever lower and less reliable payment for articles, stingier advances for books, fewer jobs, and smaller royalty checks. A host of new threats to writers’ livelihoods, from internet piracy to the slow-motion collapse of the academic job market, means ever fewer writers are making a middle-class wage."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Yet the public presentation of the profession remains stubbornly bourgeois. The acknowledgements pages of books tend toward lists of prestigious grants, residencies, and thanks given for the gracious loan of someone’s house in the Florida Keys; I’ve never seen anyone acknowledge the SNAP program or Medicaid, although they’ve almost certainly funded far more writers than the NEA. Even when a novel is marketed as a depiction of the working poor by a working-class writer, the press around the book usually suggests that the author, by becoming an author, has now escaped that underworld. Of course this isn’t always true — the author may not have “escaped” and doesn’t necessarily think it’s an underworld — but that narrative tends to creep into every crack."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"I can still get uncomfortable, though, when I remember that Woolf didn’t just doubt the possibility of writing without economic security; she doubted the possibility of writing well without it. She says fiction produced like that “must wither at nightfall; it cannot grow in the minds of others.” Even with so many historical examples of perpetually broke writers who produced great books, I can’t help feeling a pang of doubt. My more recent novels really are better, I think, than the ones I wrote in poverty. I assume that’s mainly because I’m more mature as a writer — but surely the stability I’ve had in recent years, the ability to think uninterrupted, is part of it too. I can’t help worrying that my writing might fall apart if my fortunes changed."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"But when I look at other people’s work, I feel no such uncertainty. First of all, it’s clear to me we need poor writers more, not less, than writers with $40K a year. We can’t understand poverty if we never hear about it in the first person and the present tense; if we’re never reminded that, for poor people, poverty is happening to me, right now. And the recent viral success of first-person accounts of working-class life by writers like Linda Tirado and Lauren Hough attests to our collective hunger for writing about this experience. Finally, whatever poor writers lose from working in difficult circumstances they gain from the urgency of what they have to say; much of the greatest writing we have was produced in insecurity and squalor. This is the lesson of writers like Jean Rhys, Stephen Crane, Zora Neale Hurston, Fyodor Dostoevsky — and the list goes on and on and on."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Snow White Is Real (and She's a Chinese Vlogger) https://www.messynessychic.com/2019/03/12/snow-white-is-real-and-shes-a-chinese-vlogger/

Comment

"Our team watched, entranced, as Ziqi scurried through the misty morning air of her village, dutifully followed by not one but three baby animals (two puppies and lamb); we observed her gather nuts and fruits in a dewy field, getting home just before sunset to cook them into candies for the “Spring Festival.” She does all of this, for the record, without getting a hair from her Disney Princess-esque head out of place. Naturally, we decided we’re in love. And we’re not alone. In China, Ziqi is queen: a reclusive influencer (words we never thought we’d pair) whose cinematic webisodes on simple and ancient country living have garnered her 15.3 million Weibo (the Chinese version of YouTube) followers."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Turgenev Dissed Russia but Is Still Lionized as Literary Star by Touchy Kremlin https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/11/world/europe/russia-turgenev.html

Comment

"His writings contain sometimes withering comments about his homeland, which he sorely missed when he was absent but also often deplored. “Russian people are lazy and slow, and not accustomed to thinking independently, nor acting consistently,” Turgenev wrote in an 1857 letter to a conservative Russian countess. “But necessity — that great word! — will stir even this bear up out of its den.” He didn’t mellow much with time, writing two decades later to a friend: “We are so disgustingly poor in Russia — this is the problem and why we are so prone to steal.” From France, he delivered this judgment on his homeland: “In Russia, clever, talented and honest people are very rare.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"In the great debate between so-called westernizers and Slavophiles that dominated intellectual and political discussion in 19th-century Russia and that still rumbles on today, Turgenev stood firmly with those who thought Russia belonged in Europe and must shun what he considered foolish fantasies of a separate Russian path. But those fantasies have again taken flight in recent years, promoted by Russia-first nationalists, the Russian Orthodox Church and also the Ministry of Culture, headed by a deeply conservative historian, Vladimir Medinsky, who fumes against Western culture and despises modern-day versions of westernizers like Turgenev. Yet at the same time, Mr. Medinsky has plowed money into celebrating Turgenev and his place in the pantheon of Russian literature. His ministry financed the rebuilding of Turgenev’s family estate and in November opened a new museum in central Moscow, housed in the former home of the writer’s mother, whom Turgenev loathed, feared and loved dearly."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"Some of Turgenev’s characters said such nasty things about Russia that when the British publisher Penguin Books quoted one of them, without attribution, in an advertising campaign on the London underground, Russia’s Foreign Ministry complained of “disgusting Russophobia” by Britain. The quote in question — “Aristocracy, liberalism, progress, principles … Useless words! A Russian doesn’t need them.” — came from Yevgeny Bazarov, a nihilist rebel in Turgenev’s best-known novel, “Fathers and Sons,” part of which he wrote at his estate near Mtsensk. The ministry did not explain how the words of a Russian character in a novel written more than 150 years ago by a Russian reveal contemporary British prejudice toward Russia."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Police Department Share The Most Ridiculous Call Of 2019 Where Two People Refused To Move Out Of Each Other’s Way https://www.boredpanda.com/karen-and-chad-road-rage-lawrence-police/

Comment

"The center characters of the story about a ridiculous parking lot standoff are “Karen” and “Chad” – a couple of strangers who refused to move out of each other’s way in the parking lot. Hence, “Karen” decided that the best way to solve the issue was to call the police, which she did. As per Lawrence PD, two “two unfortunate souls” were called to a “road rage in progress” report on one Wednesday night. The person behind the Twitter thread also kindly noted, that this time that the two officers “will never get back.”"

 ‎· JustDuckie
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» posted to JustDuckie, nature, and science

Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou -- ScienceDaily https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190306125356.htm

Comment

"Researchers used motion-triggered cameras to capture photographs of wolves, caribou, and other wildlife species in the Canadian Oil Sands. The study captured more than 500,000 photographs that were used to study the habitat use patterns of the animals and test management strategies aimed at reducing the impacts of the linear developments on caribou. The results showed that disrupting the ability of wolves to travel on the linear developments can reduce the ability of wolves to access caribou habitat, without building fences or culling wolves."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"A paper describing the research is published in the March issue of the Journal of Animal Ecology, a British Ecological Society journal. The paper reveals new methods for using motion-triggered cameras to study animals. In doing so, researchers found that spreading logs, felling trees, or roughing the soil surface of the linear developments can be used as a habitat recovery strategy to disrupt the ability of humans and predators to access the critical habitats of at-risk caribou."

 ‎· JustDuckie
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Finding Sanctuary in Cemeteries, the Forests of the Dead | Miranda Schmidt https://catapult.co/stories/finding-sanctuary-in-cemeteries-the-forests-of-the-dead

Comment

"If you wander through Lone Fir, you’ll find headstones in the shape of stumps marking the graves of the men who lived by logging, back when Portland was founded on the back of an industry that felled trees to build a city. The bigleaf maples, famous for their unrestrained growth, live at the north end of the cemetery. Here, their trunks have expanded to engulf the headstones they once guarded, devouring them, inch by inch, in widening bark. Underneath, it is easy to imagine their roots growing through the old coffins."

 ‎· JustDuckie
Comment

"This is the dream of many, this death spent in the roots of a tree. If you search the internet, you can find eco burials that are a manifestation of our attempts to become more eco-conscious in the face of environmental crisis, but that also grow from our ancient associations of death with trees. You can now inter ashes in burial pods made to decompose and feed a tree planted with your remains. You get to choose the species. You could be buried in a graveyard forest, with only a tree (and precise GPS coordinates) as your marker. I imagine a future in which our cemeteries become forests of the dead, human bodies turned tree, families wrapping arms around bark in remembrance of a loved one, people tending trees with an attention that crosses the distance of species."

 ‎· JustDuckie

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