"The researchers found that 96 percent of girls and 87 percent of boys had viewed Disney Princess media. And while more than 61 percent of girls played with princess toys at least once a week, only four percent of boys did the same. For both boys and girls, more interactions with the princesses predicted more female gender-stereotypical behavior a year later. Gendered behavior can become problematic if girls avoid important learning experiences that aren’t perceived as feminine or believe their opportunities in life are different as women. “We know that girls who strongly adhere to female gender stereotypes feel like they can’t do some things,” Coyne said. “They’re not as confident that they can do well in math and science. They don’t like getting dirty, so they’re less likely to try and experiment with things.”" ‎- JustDuckie
"Coyne says not to get too heavy with younger children, but pointing out the positives and negatives can help kids be more aware of the media they’re consuming. She’s even done this with her own daughter: What drives me crazy is when you get a princess who’s not gender stereotyped, like Merida from Brave. I took my daughter to see it, and afterward we had a great coversation about how strong, brave and independent Merida was in the movie. And then in the marketing, Disney slims her down, sexualizes her, takes away her bow and arrow, gives her makeup—feminizes her. So then we’re at the supermarket and see this ‘new Merida’ on fruit snacks and soup cans, and I point it out to my daughter and we have a conversation about the difference. And now when we’re at the store, she’ll see the soup can herself and say, ‘That’s not the real Merida and I’m not buying it.’" ‎- JustDuckie

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