History

The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Matthew Hodson on Twitter "“20 years ago, 2 years after the arrival of combination therapy that effectively treated #HIV, the Bay Area Reporter, San Francisco’s LGBT newspaper ran ‘No Obits’ as its headline. It was the first edition not to report an AIDS death in almost 15 years.”" https://twitter.com/Matthew_Hodson/status/1029256807615787008

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster, history, and science

RAS Women in STEM on Twitter “Dorothy Johnson Vaughan was an American mathematician and programmer from Missouri. She was one of many black women who worked as a ‘computer’ for NACA, although she was segregated from her white colleagues until 1958, when NACA became NASA.#STEMlegends #WomenInSTEM #BlackAndSTEMhttps://twitter.com/ras_women/status/1028723698222739457?s=21

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster, history, and brits-irish

English Radical History on Twitter "“#OnThisDay 1872: The first voting by secret ballot took place in a by-election at Pontefract. Before the Ballot Act, voters declared their candidate openly leading to intimidation and bribery by employers and landlords. The ballot was a #Chartist demand. https://t.co/4xuNa1j8t7”" https://twitter.com/englishradical/status/1029714397227311104...

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Chris Woodyard on Twitter “@whatgrandmawore @metmuseum Young woman working as advertising "billboard" on roller skates, c. 1900 California. Your dress might be fancy dress or for an advert.” https://twitter.com/hauntedohiobook/status/102902719124017561...

Chris Woodyard on Twitter “@whatgrandmawore @metmuseum Young woman working as advertising "billboard" on roller skates, c. 1900 California. Your dress might be fancy dress or for an advert.” https://twitter.com/hauntedohiobook/status/102902719124017561...

Avatar for eyebrowsonfire
» posted to JustDuckie and history

Tattooing in the Civil War Was a Hedge Against Anonymous Death https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/civil-war-tattoos

Comment
"The Civil War helped tattooing begin a transition from the military to wider society, and ushered in the style of classic tattooing unique to America. Tattooing had long been widespread among sailors, but during the war men who would never have considered getting a tattoo before wanted a way to show their allegiance to their cause and to identify themselves in the event of death. “Your stripes can get torn off in battle,” says Paul Roe, a tattoo historian. “Tattoos can’t.”" ‎· JustDuckie
Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil and history

The Real Story of How a Black Cop Infiltrated the KKK "An offhand response to an ad from the KKK led to an extensive investigation for detective Ron Stallworth." https://www.history.com/news/black-cop-infiltrate-kkk-real-story

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Working Class History on Twitter “#OtD 14 Aug 1944 Italian resistance partisan Irma Bandiera was murdered by the Nazis. She refused to give up her comrades despite being tortured for 7 days. Today, a street commemorates her in her native Bologna #herstoryhttps://twitter.com/wrkclasshistory/status/1029197951141388289

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Dr Caitlin Green on Twitter “The evolution of elephant depiction through the middle ages: https://t.co/3eMAXqGf8w :) #WorldElephantDayhttps://twitter.com/caitlinrgreen/status/1028573672158781446

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

WorldVegetableCenter on Twitter “#IHC2018 Dr. Nurhan Atasoy on the evolution of Ottoman #gardens through miniature paintings. Must-haves: cypress trees, water, birds! @ishs_horthttps://twitter.com/go_vegetables/status/1028678624147333120?...

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

ResCUE-AB on Twitter “Altre presentazioni al #IHC2018 sul l’agricoltura nella preistoria e dall’impero Ottomano a oggi (con uno sguardo sul ruolo dei fiori *)” https://twitter.com/rescueab/status/1028696746078232576?s=21

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Arsène Tchakarian, World War II resistance fighter in France, dies at 101 "Mr. Tchakarian was part of an Armenian-led guerrilla campaign against Nazi occupiers of France." https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/arsene-tchaka...

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster, history, and science

Siobhan on Twitter “Discovered yet another fabulous artist - Thérèse Ekblom from Sweden. At least this time she's been written about! See https://t.co/rZysEyfWln Have added her to @wikidata. https://t.co/z1GDtMV7ey Will do more research & then request a creator id from .@BioDivLibraryhttps://twitter.com/siobhanleachman/status/102834929024925696...

Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil, history, and places

Once Upon a Summer in Black Eden... http://www.messynessychic.com/2018/08/08/once-upon-a-time-in-...

Comment
Today, the glory days of Idlewild feel a bit like a fever dream. Just ask any of the African American vacationers who made the pilgrimage to the Michigan resort from the 1910s-60s. “It was something that you’d never believe…stranger than fiction,” reflects one woman in Coy Davis Jr.’s documentary, Whatever Happened to Idlewild? In the midst of Jim Crow segregation, Idlewild became so much more than just a summer retreat for the affluent black community. It was a Garden of Eden. ‎· Halil
Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil and history

10 Turks ordered to be killed for each Greek during Cyprus violence: Report "A Greek Cypriot newspaper published new documents about the violent years that led to the division of the Mediterranean island some five decades ago, including an instruction on Greek Cypriot security forces ordering that “10 Turks shall be killed for each Hellen.”" http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/10-turks-ordered-to-be-kille...

Comment
and sadly this isn't a shocker either...I've see photos of the Turkish mass graves!!! :'( ‎· Halil
Comment
unfortunately I don't read/speak Greek, some of my family do/did, so I'm having trouble finding the original Greek article, either my search words are off or the Greek news site removed the post due to death threats by the Greeks. this is the site http://politis.com.cy/ It should be noted as I've mentioned before, you can't lump us all in one group, Greeks vs Turks, some Greeks do indeed recognise the war crimes committed against us but often their voices (and lives during the conflict) are quelled!!! ‎· Halil
Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

SmithsonianAirSpace on Twitter “This summer, our aeronautics intern explored the @USNatArchives collection of images from the Women Airforce Service Pilots. See some newly digitized WWII photos * https://t.co/DVlebjrOvihttps://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1028055904615378944?s=21

Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil, history, and positive

This Taiwanese Museum Just Digitized Its Massive Collection of Chinese Art 70,000 images are available for download via the National Palace Museum’s website https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/taiwanese-museum-ju...

Comment
Thanks! ‎· JustDuckie
Avatar for bentleywg
» posted to bentley and history

"Clothing Britain's Spies during World War II" | JSTOR Daily "To hide in plain sight while on assignment in foreign nations, agents needed precisely tailored clothes made to look local." https://daily.jstor.org/clothing-britains-spies-wwii/

Comment
"“Meticulous care was taken that every article of clothing and all accessories should be an exact replica of items manufactured in France,” recalled Claire Wrench, an SOE worker at Orchard Court, a mansion in London where agents got ready before parachuting into France. “Even the buttons on the men’s suits needed to be sewn on in a special French style.” In France, buttons were usually threaded in two parallel lines, rather than a crisscross pattern. Such differences, which in other circumstances might seem tiny and insignificant, could give a spy away. For instance, in the 1940s, many men still wore detachable collars, which fastened onto the shirt with small studs, like cufflinks. In Britain, the stud hole on the back of the collar was a vertical slit; on the continent, it was horizontal—something a German officer could easily check." ‎· bentley 4
Comment
Fascinating! ‎· LB! ッ
Comment
In the historical re-enacting world, people who criticize other people for their clothing not being authentic enough are sometimes called “stitch nazis.” This ... brings that concept to a whole new level. ‎· Catherine 9
Comment
Snitches need stitches, as it were. ;) ‎· LB! ッ 5
Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil and history

Along the River During the Qingming Festival - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Along_the_River_During_the_Qing...

Comment
Along the River During the Qingming Festival, also known by its Chinese name as the Qingming Shanghe Tu, is a painting by the Song dynasty artist Zhang Zeduan (1085–1145). It captures the daily life of people and the landscape of the capital, Bianjing (present-day Kaifeng) during the Northern Song. The theme is often said to celebrate the festive spirit and worldly commotion at the Qingming Festival, rather than the holiday's ceremonial aspects, such as tomb sweeping and prayers. Successive scenes reveal the lifestyle of all levels of the society from rich to poor as well as different economic activities in rural areas and the city, and offer glimpses of period clothing and architecture.[1] The painting is considered to be the most renowned work among all Chinese paintings,[2][3][4] and it has been called "China's Mona Lisa."[5] ‎· Halil
Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil, history, and linguistics

Gung-ho - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gung-ho

Comment
Gung-ho /ˈɡʌŋˈhoʊ/ is an English term with the current meaning of "enthusiastic" or "overzealous". It is an anglicised pronunciation of "gōng hé" (工合), which is also sometimes anglicised as "kung-ho". "Gōnghé" is a shortened version of the term "gōngyè hézuòshè" (工業合作社) or Chinese Industrial Cooperatives, which was abbreviated as Indusco in English. The two Chinese characters "gōng" and "hé" mean respectively "work" and "together". The linguist Albert Moe studied both the origin and the usage in English. He concluded that the term is an "Americanism that is derived from the Chinese, but its several accepted American meanings have no resemblance whatsoever to the recognized meaning in the original language" and that its "various linguistic uses, as they have developed in the United States, have been peculiar to American speech." In Chinese, concludes Moe, "this is neither a slogan nor a battle cry; it is only a name for an organization."[1] The term was picked up by United States Marine Corps Major Evans Carlson from his New Zealand friend, Rewi Alley, one of the founders of the Chinese Industrial Cooperatives. Carlson explained in a 1943 interview: "I was trying to build up the same sort of working spirit I had seen in China, where all the soldiers dedicated themselves to one idea and worked together to put that idea over. I told the boys about it again and again. I told them of the motto of the Chinese Cooperatives, Gung Ho. It means Work Together-Work in Harmony...."[2] Later Carlson used gung-ho during his (unconventional) command of the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion. From there, it spread throughout the U.S. Marine Corps hence the association between the two, where it was used as an expression of spirit and into American society as a whole when the phrase became the title of a 1943 war film, Gung Ho!, about the 2nd Raider Battalion's raid on Makin Island in 1942. ‎· Halil
Comment
was just telling @eyebrowsonfire decided to randomly look this up, never knew its origins. ‎· Halil
Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

LAhistory on Twitter “Jazz legend Buddy Collette was born in Los Angeles #OTD in 1921. His oral history via @UCLALSC: https://t.co/GVWzx3duCV #jazzhistoryhttps://twitter.com/lahistory/status/1026611935469391872?s=21

Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Michaela Cornell on Twitter “My mom kept this. Perhaps as proof of the bullshit women had to put up with. “You’re pregnant? You’re fired.”” https://twitter.com/mcpublic/status/1023282785044193281

Comment
Not even a congratulations or anything, what a cold letter! ‎· Halil 1
Comment
@halil: Well, I think the congratulations would have come off even worse. “Congratulations on your newborn!..... You’re fired.” ‎· Spidra Webster 4
Comment
At one time, only unmarried women could be teachers. If they married, they were expected to retire, stay at home, be housewives, and raise kids. And being unmarried and pregnant was scandalous, reason for immediate dismissal. Religious schools, especially, didn't want pregnant bellies in the classroom, fearing the children might ask too many questions related to where babies come from, so they kept up with the practice of firing pregnant teachers, regardless of marital status, long after they finally accepted married women in the classroom. ‎· April 2
Comment
@spidra: Good point! @app103 In UK unmarried pregnant women, often rape victims, were thrown into asylums and forgotten about! :( ‎· Halil
Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil and history

A siege. A bomb. 48 dogs. And the black commune that would not surrender | Forty years ago, Philadelphia erupted in one of the most dramatic shoot-outs of the black liberation struggle. Ed Pilkington tells the surreal story of the Move 9 – and what happened to them next https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/31/a-siege-a-bomb-...

Comment
The photograph is one of the standout images of the 1970s black liberation struggle. An African American man, his hair in dreadlocks, chest bare, stands with arms outstretched as though emulating Jesus on the cross. A white police officer is jabbing a shotgun at him with the muzzle inches from his throat. Another officer clasps a police helmet in his right hand as if preparing to whack him over the head with it. ‎· Halil
Comment
Forty years almost to the day after that photo was taken, the same black man described how he came to be standing there on a sidewalk, half-naked and surrounded by angry police. His account was almost too graphic to grasp, sounding more like something out of a movie than the recollection of what really happened in the heart of one of America’s major cities. ‎· Halil
Comment
It was 8 August 1978 and he had just emerged from the basement of the house in Philadelphia that his black revolutionary group, Move, used as a communal home. In an attempt to evict them from the property, hundreds of officers had just stormed the building, pummeling it with water cannons and gunfire, and in the maelstrom a police officer had been killed and several other first responders injured. ‎· Halil
Comment
“As I emerged from the basement I had the presence of mind to let them see I was unarmed, so I took my shirt off,” the black man said. “That’s when I put my arms out wide.” ‎· Halil
Avatar for spidra
» posted to Spidra Webster and history

Catherine DeSpira on Twitter “My search for "Lost Women Arcade Champions" is growing every day. The whole "women didn't play arcade games" is BS. They DID play. Pac-Man. Tempest. Defender. Stargate. Galaga. Battlezone, etc. A lot of them kicked ass, too. #ArcadeHistory (Photo May 1982, Press and Sun Bulletin)” https://twitter.com/catdespira/status/1025062478152052736?s=21

Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil, history, and brits-irish

As a history teacher, I'm horrified by the whitewashing of my curriculum "Often, my conscience leads me to digress from convoluted lesson plans to shine the light on how the enslavement of non-white people was in Britain’s national interest" https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/black-history-month-colo... *** plz see https://mokum.place/halil/2070673

Comment
I’m Tired Of Black History Being Whitewashed "Black History Month is a crucial time for reflecting on the ways Black Americans have contributed to American society. It’s also an important time to tell more stories about all of the prejudices Black Americans have faced throughout the decades that have long been erased from history books — not just the popular narratives most people know about, like Rosa Parks' refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger because she was "tired" (spoiler alert: she was, in fact, a capital-A Activist). I'm tired of Black History being whitewashed, revised, and erased — and as Black History Month winds down, it's an important time to look at why this happens, and how we can prevent it from happening going forward." (by Shammara Lawrence) https://www.bustle.com/p/im-tired-of-black-history-being-whit... ‎· Halil
Comment
Conservatives want to rewrite the history of the Crusades for modern political ends. At the National Prayer Breakfast, President Obama made a statement that you wouldn’t expect to be controversial: violence in the name of religion is a global problem and it’s bad. He referenced the war in Syria, the killings in Nigeria, anti-Semitism’s resurgence in Europe and religious violence in India. He admitted that it can be hard to “counteract such intolerance. But God compels us to try.” Then he offered a longer thought about humility: Humanity has been grappling with these questions throughout human history. And lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to some other place, remember that during the Crusades and the Inquisition, people committed terrible deeds in the name of Christ. In our home country, slavery and Jim Crow all too often was justified in the name of Christ. The subsequent controversy fuelled by right-wing American commentators and politicians has shown that humility is in short supply. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/07/conserv... ‎· Halil
Comment
How History Classes Helped Create a 'Post-Truth' America The author of Lies My Teacher Told Me discusses how schools’ flawed approach to teaching the country’s past affects its civic health. In 1995, the University of Vermont sociologist and historian James W. Loewen published a book that sought to debunk the myriad myths children were often taught about the United States’ past. Framed largely as a critique of the history education delivered in America’s classrooms but also serving as a history text itself, Lies My Teacher Told Me was the result of Loewen’s analysis of a dozen major high-school textbooks. It found that those materials frequently taught students about topics including the first Thanksgiving, the Civil and Vietnam Wars, and the Americas before Columbus arrived in incomplete, distorted, or otherwise flawed ways. Take, for example, the false yet relatively widespread conviction that the Reconstruction era was a chaotic period whose tumult was attributable to poor, uncivilized governance of recently freed slaves. Textbooks’ framing of the history in this way, according to Loewen, promoted racist attitudes among white people. White supremacists in the South, for example, repeatedly cited this interpretation of Reconstruction to justify the prevention of black people from voting. https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/08/history... ‎· Halil 1
Avatar for bentleywg
» posted to bentley and history

Hidden Brain (podcast): Creating God (53.26): "If you've taken part in a religious service, have you ever stopped to think about how it all came to be? How did people become believers? Where did the rituals come from? And most of all, what purpose does it all serve? This week, we explore these questions with psychologist Azim Shariff, who argues that we can think of religion from a Darwinian perspective, as an innovation that helped human societies to survive and flourish." https://www.npr.org/2018/07/16/629616978/creating-god

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10