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» posted to Spidra Webster, history, and gardens

Jersey City Past & Present: Peter Henderson & Company http://www.njcu.edu/programs/jchistory/Pages/H_Pages/Henderson_Peter.htm

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I was watching a livecast of a tour of the seed catalogs at the USDA Nat'l Agricultural Library on Facebook. They later posted links to some of the places that house the assets of these companies. I seem to recall them mentioning that the address where this company was located (Courtlandt St in NYC) is where the World Trade Center was later built.

 ‎· Spidra Webster
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"One of Jersey City's most unusual and colorful industries in the mid-nineteenth century was market gardening. Carriages, and later trucks, carting off shipments of fresh, locally grown produce and cut flowers to nearby markets were once a commonplace sight on the streets of the city. Greenhouses and small gardens made use of undeveloped tracts of land across the otherwise industrial community and enterprising horticulturists employed intensive cultivation techniques to produce a wide variety of flowers, ornamental plants, and vegetables. Easily forgotten, these gardening operations contributed to the unique mix of Jersey City's diverse economy even though they left no notable landmark buildings or other physical traces of their activities."

 ‎· Spidra Webster
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"Peter and James Henderson, brothers and immigrants from Scotland, founded what ultimately became two prosperous gardening businesses in Jersey City. Their companies flourished by specializing in different niches in the market gardening trade and by adopting cooperative business relationships with each other. James Henderson, the older of the two, established a separate truck farm for vegetables in the Greenville section of Jersey City. James' own potential was cut short by his early death, but his brother Peter came to be known to his peers as "the father of horticulture and ornamental gardening" in the United States. "

 ‎· Spidra Webster
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Maybe this is why NJ got the nickname "The Garden State"...

 ‎· Spidra Webster
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According to a state website, the origin is unclear, though possibly associated with the Centennial Exposition: http://www.state.nj.us/njfacts/garden.htm But there seem to be earlier uses associated with agriculture in general: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/origin-of-new-jerseys-garden-state-nickname-debunked-20170811.html

 ‎· John B.
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@dendroica: All I know is that later landscapes of NJ mean it's taken a lot of ribbing for that nickname.

 ‎· Spidra Webster
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It is kind of a weird nickname. Agriculture and gardening are probably among the less significant things about the state and its history (though there is still some agriculture & a land grant university).

 ‎· John B.
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Also, the Jersey City piece is an example of how closely New Jersey's economy is tied to New York's. We're either producing stuff for NYC, or transporting it there from somewhere else, or sending workers into NYC, or serving as a vacation spot (mainly along the shore).

 ‎· John B.
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@dendroica: Sorta like the relationship between Copenhagen and Malmö now that they've got that bridge. Or more apt - SF and Oakland/Berkeley.

 ‎· Spidra Webster

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