Avatar for halil
» posted to Halil and history

https://www.ladbible.com/entertainment/tv-and-film-apprentice-star-learning-about-wwii-could-affect-kids-mental-health-20191101 Twenty-Two-Year-Old Instagrammer Thinks Learning About WWII Could Affect Kids' Mental Health "The comments come after the revelation that contestants on The Apprentice didn't even know when the conflict happened"

Comment

I refused to be categorized in the same box as this dude

 ‎· пустота и та не та 9
Comment

In fact, he is absolutely right. Learning some things about WW2 can severely affect kids' mental health. And adults mental health. The mild version of the war history adapted to school curriculums is okayish (though it is a fragile balance between sticking-to-the-truth and avoiding unpleasant and inconvenient details), but bland on the purpose.

 ‎· Afterjoker 2
Comment

The mild version of the war history adapted to school curriculums is okayish: TY PRO ROSSIU?

 ‎· mentegatto
Comment

^^ ^^^ guys, he is an American, WWII in USA was a bit less traumatic for the most of the population then in Europe. I believe your won't mind the fact that most millennial Europeans know almost nothing about the USA Civil War, and their parent's knowledge is limited by iconic "Gone with the Wind" movie.

 ‎· четырёх-рукая Шива 5
Comment

@sorhed: "There's violence to knowing the world isn't what you thought", yep. But that goes for most of the world history, now what? I'm more traumatized by the current politics and the state of the world.

 ‎· пустота и та не та
Comment

@spinysun: ^ yes, because the current media coverage is raw, realtime, and either non-censored, or emotionally amplified; and WW2 happened long ago, so humanity since then settled on some common description of events for regular consumption, with gory details left to professional historians. Still, the events of WW2 (and the corresponding state of the world) are infinitely more traumatizing than anything that happens today. One really should hope that nothing like it will ever happen again (and yes, paradoxically we need to study actual war history for that). By the way, the modern state of the world is still fine, 7/10; it is on the slight decline, sure, compared to some bright moments of the happy days of the "End of history" (80s-90s, excluding Russia and some other unfortunate places), but still better than anything that was ever before that.

 ‎· Afterjoker 4
Comment

@sorhed: "Still, the events of WW2 (and the corresponding state of the world) are infinitely more traumatizing than anything that happens today" - what makes you write statements like this? How the fuck you are able to compare? Is it cause your ancestors/grandparents have suffered from WWII while you are safely tucked away from many of the modern horrors? Is current hunger in Yemen no worse than rationing in USA under WWII? Is genocide of Rohingya, Yazidi or Sudanese tribes any less horrifying than the genocide of the jews? What about atrocities committed with modern warfare by "civilized" parties? I won't even mention non-war crimes.

 ‎· пустота и та не та 2
Comment

@spinysun: ^ these are awful, but the scale is still incomparable; and in the true world war, there is nowhere to hide or immigrate to. The bar is set with the Holocaust, with the wholesale mincemeat of the Eastern front, with things like Unit 731, Nanjing massacre, and Hiroshima. With Tokyo and Dresden bombings. So while there are atrocities committed by present parties, they still cannot be compared to world wide hell. Yes, I know, every life is sacred, and everything. However, “the state of the world” is different.

 ‎· Afterjoker 3
Comment

@sorhed: so, it's incomparable and yet you compare? I'm answering to your "events of WW2 are infinitely more traumatizing than anything that happens today". Obviously it is a completely subjective pov and I should just leave you alone in sorrows over Western world WWII trauma. Yet it strikes me, let's say, odd to ignore everything that has happened since all around the globe and is happening now cause, well, oh, numbers are bigger and places like Rwanda, Indonesia, Cambodia etc are all too far away to be considered.

 ‎· пустота и та не та 2
Comment

@sorhed: as for "nowhere to immigrate to" i beg you to look at the current refugee flow, people from French camps, people on Italian coast, people in locked facilities where they expect a decision for years and years and tell them they have somewhere to go.

 ‎· пустота и та не та 1
Comment

@spinysun: those locked facilities etc., while not pleasant in any sense, do solve those people's immediate problem (they are (more) physically safe there than wherever they fled)

 ‎· очный долб
Comment

@spinysun: ^^ Same things happened in the WW2, on a much larger scale. You a right that some of these things are _still_ happening, which is really sad (except, I hope, the horrors like Unit 731 and firebombing the cities full of civilians). I am not ignoring them. But yes, "the numbers are bigger". Now, some people are suffering from local wars, which is awful of course. Back then, everybody was in the warlike state, war was inescapable, the only thing that is mattered to everyone in all countries and states was war. Waiting for one's fate in the Italian sorting camp beats dying from the gas chamber or the atomic blast or the firestorm or being slowly dismembered by Unit 731 "doctors", if you ask me.

 ‎· Afterjoker 1
Comment

@sorhed: firebombing cities full of civilians has just been happening fx in Syria. (The only thing that matters to biggest players is still war with the difference now they earn on it on a state level). As for refugee camp life - you obviously are blissfully unaware. Since that knowledge might traumatize you, I'll stop right here. But in general fuck that shit sideways, measuring horror by numbers and by placing in the western world/not western world.

 ‎· пустота и та не та
Comment

@spinysun: At any point in human history some unspeakable horrors have happened to somebody. If we accept it at face value and refuse to use numbers, then it is meaningless to compare, and life in general is brutal and insurmountable and should be ended for everyone as soon as possible, this is the only moral decision. I am not an extinction rebel and I do not subscribe to this point of view. There should be means to measure progress and reduction of amount of total suffering.

 ‎· Afterjoker 1
Comment

@sorhed: it IS meaningless to compare

 ‎· пустота и та не та
Comment

The only way to make young people stronger is to expose them to the world. Understanding war allows students to move away from seeing history as most people see it — simply chronicling events — to how historians see the past: as a matter of interpretation and reinterpretation. This is crucial because engaging these past moments enables students to see the present developments in a new light and to understand the complex, often tragic decisions that led to the turning points in history. Additionally, studying war provides an alternative to the very common focus on the perceived heroism and nobility of war and consequently avoid the excessive valorization of global violence. War is hell: a clear understanding of this crucial fact is important in an era when everything becomes distant and impersonal for many. From the battlefields of WWI to today’s Middle East complexities, it’s also important for students to learn that it’s their civic responsibility to understand and assess violence being waged in their name. Today’s students are tomorrow’s citizens.

 ‎· Kerplakistan Café-chantant 6
Comment

@sorhed: just curious: to me this statement (about 7/10, but fine in general) slightly contradicts your other statements about an imminent big war that's about to happen. Agree on other points though

 ‎· fram

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10