“Genericide” is what happens when a trademark becomes synonymous with the class that it represents. At that point, the trademark is rendered null and void and anyone can use the term to describe (and more importantly, sell) those products. Genericide is why Adobe is particular about people using ‘photoshop’ as a verb; trademarks need to be defended assiduously to avoid losing them. 'Trampoline' was once the trademarked name, and Frisbees (correctly, but rarely, known as ‘flying discs’) are still trademarked by Wham-O, but in constant jeopardy.
My favourite example of genericide is heroin, so named because it made you feel heroic; Bayer owned the trademark, but it was annulled as part of the Treaty of Versailles [http://www.opioids.com/heroin/heroinhistory.html] (although they had stopped manufacturing it a few years earlier, as it had quickly become clear that it was incredibly addictive). ‎- visions of swastikas in my head
— Deb Chachra, Metafoundry 57 ‎- visions of swastikas in my head

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