When the building now identified as 601 Lexington Avenue was conceived, there was one problem. On the plot of land where it was to be built, there was already a church. Good news was the church let them use the land. Since the church building was fairly small, they could build however they wanted _as long as the church remained intact and in place, with no connection to the new building_. http://two-wrongs.com/the-bug-in-the-physical-building
Remember how a corner is the strongest part of a building? Not this one. With the pillars on the edges, the V-shaped load distributors, and the light mass of the building, the corners are the weakest part of the building. The safety margins in the original calculation were still so good it would have worked, though. The straw that broke the camel's back was the optimisation of switching out stronger welded joints for weaker bolted joints. ‎- unihorny biped
It was therefore predicted 601 Lexington Avenue would after just a few years come crashing down on downtown New York City, taking several other skyscrapers and, more importantly lives, with it. It was only waiting for a storm strong enough to hit it diagonally. ‎- unihorny biped
This is what happens when you cross with a church. ‎- 9000