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I do not understand why people put their religious stuff - even if it's volunteerism - on their resumes.

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I've yet to see that. I wonder if they think it's going to help with some employers ("Oh, I see this person is one of us. Sounds promising.")

 ‎· Stephen Francoeur 1
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I work at a religious-affiliated college, and some people put religious stuff on their resumes or in their cover letters as a subtle way of signalling their convergence or divergence from the college's affiliation. (When I applied, I addressed my divergence directly in my cover letter.) Why they would put such stuff on a resume to a secular employer is beyond me, though.

 ‎· Catherine 2
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I could definitely see that at a religious school.

 ‎· rachelw
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My last place of work considered volunteerism (including at religious institutions) a form of "service" in the same way as serving on a library, university, state, or national committee. As a result I can see a candidate viewing inclusion as an indication they are involved in the community they serve, which I think many employers would see as a good thing (involvement in the community they serve, I mean).

 ‎· Soup 3
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The volunteer stuff makes sense for community or perhaps in showing leadership, depending. I would find it a little more odd to see just a statement of affiliation. But I figure they have their reasons. One female candidate I interviewed very specifically included "me and my wife" in her cover letter -- very clearly signaling there. Not something the search committee can consider in making the decision of qualification but I can see why they did it. Definitely a Choose Carefully what you put in there thing.

 ‎· hedgielib 1
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Also, after 5 years in the South I've come to realize that a significant portion of the population do not code their religious background as "private." For some people, it's a part of their identity as much as race, ethnic identity, sex, etc. For people with that perspective, suggesting you not list religious stuff would be like suggesting you not indicate you were the president of the Black Student Union or served on the community board of your local NOW chapter. Certainly there are possible political ramifications for doing so, but they're shitty and silencing and for some people not worth lying about the truth of who they are. It was a weird perspective to get used to, but I understand it now. Or at least I understand it better. :) ETA: I should note that I still don't and wouldn't list my religious affiliation on a resume. But my religion isn't an important part of my self concept.

 ‎· Soup 4
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OMG, a scientist I know just posted on this same subject on Twitter. They have people applying to their lab and religion was mentioned on several CVs.

 ‎· Spidra Webster 1
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Following up on @soup's comment, I could also see including some aspect of religious affiliation on a resume or cover letter as a form of signalling similar to the instance @hedgielib offered: kind of a statement of, "this is an important part of who I am, and if that's going to be a problem in this workplace it's better that we're all clear about that from the outset."

 ‎· Catherine 2
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We're in the south. I'm a lifelong southerner, so I'm pretty familiar with the culture. And it's pretty much always area-dominant religions listed - I NEVER see it listed if somebody is anything other than something like Southern Baptist. The explicit service ones make more sense to me, but sometimes it's just "Member of..." BSU or board of local NOW would be actual work/service performed w associated skills, church membership alone is not. Yet I'm pretty sure it would be the former that would raise eyebrows around here more often.

 ‎· rachelw 1
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(I do get putting specific concrete church service on the document, if it ties to the position somehow. It's the more disconnected stuff that I don't get.)

 ‎· rachelw
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Catherine that definitely makes sense. But it seems like it would also make it an issue of "Well how or how much is this identity piece going to impact your work?" which the applicant might not want to suggest.

 ‎· rachelw
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(I don't have answers, just thinking it through)

 ‎· rachelw
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Side Question: has anyone ever seen anything other than some flavor of Christianity explicitly on a resume/CV? I cannot think of any instances where I have, though it's been a year or so since I was on a search.

 ‎· hedgielib
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@hedgielib: no

 ‎· Galen Charlton
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@hedgielib nope

 ‎· rachelw
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@hedgielib: Explicitly? No. Via service or orgs? Yes. But presumably that's a function of the evangelical vs non-evangelical model? That's always been my take on it, personally.

 ‎· Soup
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This is totally a thing we see on undergrad resumes for SLEs because most applicants don't have much actual job experience. I just talked to my assistant before this round of hiring to be open to it if they list it as any other job/position. We hired a kid who's really involved in his church and has had a couple of leadership positions in his youth group - including a bunch of data entry. He's been a good employee so far (a couple of weeks) and thankfully has only mentioned his church in the way I would talk about the college radio station when I was his age.

 ‎· Kendra K 3
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@hedgielib: I've seen volunteer work for/with both Sikh and Jewish temples listed on resumes. In each of the resumes, the volunteer work involved some form of management or project management roles, and seemed meant to highlight additional ways the applicants had employed/developed those skills. (It was a political office, and all stripes of volunteer work were listed, since that was assumed to be part of building your skill set, so any sort of volunteer work didn't seem out of place - that's all community outreach of some variety.)

 ‎· Jennifer D. 1
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Having seen an explicit effort to block the hiring of someone because of the religious affiliation they mentioned on a CV through a leadership position - and having successfully pushed back against this and ultimately hired the individual - I am just so torn about this. I can see why some people might choose to suppress such information about them, if there is a risk it will be held against them, but how sad from a diversity/inclusion perspective.

 ‎· Roger 1

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